latitudinarian


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latitudinarian

of or relating to a school of thought within the Church of England in the 17th century that minimized the importance of divine authority in matters of doctrine and stressed the importance of reason and personal judgment
References in periodicals archive ?
The chapter on Mary II details a number of achievements of this activist, forthrightly latitudinarian regnant Queen who did much to secure religious toleration and liberty for the eighteenth century by appointing twenty-five bishops opposed to preaching against Dissenters, and making Tillotson Archbishop of Canterbury.
The correct inquiry, however, is the one suggested by James Madison that runs between the latitudinarian rational basis test favored by Hamilton and the strict necessity standard favored by Jefferson.
A similarly expansive and latitudinarian spirit can be found in letters by a dozen more Jewish American fathers to their sons during the latter half of the eighteenth century and the first quarter of the nineteenth century.
The pursuit of perfection is usually foredoomed, but the Los Angeles City Ethics Commission, which has a latitudinarian understanding of ethical behavior, has a perfectly awful idea.
New alignments formed, composed of the various approaches that had failed to achieve a stable hegemony: "strict construction"-composed of historical, textual and structural elements--vied with a congeries of allegedly more latitudinarian forms--doctrinal, prudential, and ethical methods of interpretation--that its opponents ingenuously decried as "judicial activism.
In light of Eastwood's latitudinarian perspectives on religious belief, which are generally tolerant of all orthodoxies, his ethical vision seems to stem from his canny reconstruction of our culture's predominant Judeo-Christian investiture rather than from any personal avowal of faith.
Else you will secure unity of form at the loss of unity of doctrine, or unity of doctrine at the loss of unity of form; you will have to choose between a comprehension of opinions and a resolution into parties, between latitudinarian and sectarian error.
He observes that it is not so much infected yet by the latitudinarian ethics, liberal guilt complex, aversion to conversion, and capitulation to social forces that plague mainline Protestantism.
It is no happenstance that Locke was an extreme latitudinarian.
As in Latitudinarian Anglican thought, such as Locke on the "reasonableness" of (truncated) Christianity and the rejection of "enthusiasm," Polkinghorne's view implicitly gives little epistemological role to the Holy Spirit, in contrast with Calvin, Plantinga's Reformed epistemology, and perhaps the Johannine gospel and epistles.
There are a fair number of undramatised biographical passages, which make for bumpy reading, even if one takes a latitudinarian position about the role of information in novelistic prose.
The United Provinces, though Protestant, tended to be latitudinarian enough for Catholic Scots, she explains, and were alive with continental intellectual ferment during the period.