lay board

lay board

A board which is fixed on the rafters of a pitched roof to take the feet of the rafters, forming a subsidiary roof transverse to the main roof.
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And other clinical and lay board members earned between PS10,000 and PS40,000 for their roles in the CCG.
The best-known Shiite cleric in the United States has left the largest Shiite mosque in the United States after months of turmoil between the prayer leader and the mosque's lay board members.
These members need to include several of the lay board members, hospital senior management, which could include the CEO, CNO, director of performance Improvement, chief quality officer, and physicians represented by the CMO and chief of staff.
The Vatican bank, known as the Institute for Religious Works, or IOR, is cooperating with Italian authorities and its lay board has launched an internal investigation, spokesman Max Hohenberg said.
Taken together, we found that lay Board of Trustee members reported stronger perceptions of the school's mission identity than professional employees at the university (i.
Consultants may be required to translate technical language for a lay board," says Broad, "so they have to be attuned to the audience and be crisp, clear, and understandable.
Duderstadt argues that lay board members, faculty senates, and academic administrators lack the expertise to manage an increasingly complex organization.
Even though lay board membership may be a significant commitment of time and effort, there are usually more applicants than available positions, and most citizens who have served report that it was a valuable learning and, even, fun experience.
When it underwent the attrition which overtook most Catholic institutions of higher education in Canada in the nineteen sixties and seventies, it suffered a fate worse than most: a lay board, headed by a non-Catholic, appointed a president who was not a Catholic and had little respect for its Catholic foundations.
A series of letters between bishops and the lay board appointed to oversee the church's response to the sexual abuse crisis has been published by the National Catholic Reporter.
We debated among ourselves and also consulted with people in and out of the profession on whether their presence on the board would be inconsistent with the charter's implication that the board be primarily a lay board and retain its reputation for independence.