lead azide


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Related to lead azide: Lead styphnate

lead azide

[′led ′ā‚zīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
Pb(N3)2 Unstable, colorless needles that explode at 350°C; lead azide is shipped submerged in water to reduce sensitivity; used as a detonator for high explosives.
References in periodicals archive ?
The EOD specialists said the package contained the highly explosive PETN and lead azide substances, used in bomb detonators.
The original caps used chlorate of potash with fulminate of mercury, but most modern primers use lead azide, potassium per-chlorate or lead styphnate.
The devices contained lead azide, red phosphorus and barium.
Also found at the property were overalls, large quantities of surgical gloves, packages for chemicals including sodium chlorate (weedkiller), sulphuric acid, sulphur and lead azide, plus tools and face masks.
BATF officials spoke of seizing 77 machine guns, hundreds of other firearms, tens of thousands of rounds of ammunition, booby traps, tons of ammonium nitrate (the fertilizer used in the Oklahoma City bombing), and explosives such as nitromethane (also used in Oklahoma City) and lead azide, described by experts as a powerful and unstable primary explosive.
Seventy-seven machine guns dwindled to four, and the unstable lead azide was transformed into lead styphnate, then lead picrate, a less dangerous compound.
The cartridge held PETN and plastic explosives mixed with lead azide - often used in detonators.
The devices contained lead azide, red phosphorus, barium, copper, solvents, perchlorate and other chemicals.
The flame from the delay element causes the lead azide to detonate which then initiates detonation of the base charge explosive, normally PETN.
Without external stimulus, lead azide can maintain its stable condition indefinitely.
Sodium azide can also react with metals such as copper or lead form explosive copper or lead azides.