lead foil

lead foil

[′led ¦fȯil]
(metallurgy)
A foil of lead or of lead alloy containing, for example, 10-12% tin and 1% copper.
References in classic literature ?
The crate upon which I sit contains 2,000 napoleons packed between layers of lead foil.
With fire protection, 195,00 m 2 Lead foil in walls, 3,00 St.
Lead foil tape is great when dealing with harsher chemicals.
In this method the lead foil is incorporated within the denture after dewaxing the denture as required.
They were then lined with lead foil and, once filled, covered with rice straw paper and varnished.
When they were loaded into the tap, they simply fell backward into the compression chamber where the piston smashed them into thick lead foil.
The greener side of digital radiography comes about with the absolute elimination of: harsh chemicals released into local water systems, silver recovery, lead foil waste and film disposal.
Using the 100-meter long GSI accelerator, they fired zinc ions onto a lead foil.
Next morning," LaRocque later wrote, "at five o'clock, the men having eaten, went up to the summit where a hole was dug and the cross set in place, after which the document was buried in a sealed bottle wrapped in lead foil from a box of tea.
This harked back to a 1944 plan that gave French Resistance fighters lead foil tubes packed with chemicals which produced a "fecal odour".
Scrape off a few fragments of gold, weigh them carefully and then roll them in a sheet of lead foil.
A thin coating of niobium metal on the spheres sets up a slight magnetic field, which is shielded from the outside by superconducting lead foil enclosing the vacuum chamber.