leap second


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Related to leap second: leap year

leap second

See universal time.

leap second

References in periodicals archive ?
I will leap in joy definitely as this leap second won't be the first time that we will have the second.
Leap seconds are added to clocks worldwide to compensate for the slowing of the planet's rotation, affected due to friction caused by ocean tides.
1 -- color) Skip Newhall invited 30 to 35 friends over to his house in Valencia to watch his three atomic-digital clocks take note of today's leap second.
1] is the context of a leap seconds cognizant time service, [C.
In January 2012, the ITU Radiocommunication Assembly deferred the decision to develop a continuous time standard that would entail the elimination of the leap second in order to ensure that all technical options have been fully addressed before the matter is referred to the next World Radiocommunication Conference in 2015.
The 2012 leap second is the 35th leap second to be added and the first since 2008.
Opponents of the leap second want a simpler system that avoids the costs and margin for error in making manual changes to thousands of computer networks, Reuters (http://in.
Thanks to the Earth's erratic rotation, the countdown to 2009 lasted a moment longer as British physicists and official timekeepers around the world inserted a leap second to bring the most accurate atomic clocks in line with the astronomical day.
So did you make the most of the extra leap second of 2005 - kindly donated by the boffins at the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service?
1972: The first leap second was added to atomic clocks, to keep pace with the slowing rotations of the Earth.
Scientists add a leap second for the same basic reason that calendars have a leap year: because the movement of the Earth refuses to correspond exactly to our units of time.
ITU experts and membership along with other organizations have been studying the consequences of eliminating the so-called leap second to adjust to the earth s rotation in relation to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), the current standard for measuring time.