leptophos


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leptophos

[′lep·tə‚fäs]
(organic chemistry)
C13H10BrCl2O2PS A white solid with a melting point of 70.2-70.6°C; slight solubility in water; used as an insecticide on vegetables, fruit, turf, and ornamentals. Also known as O-(4-bromo-2,5-dichlorophenyl) O-methyl phenylphosphorothioate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Organophosphorus pesticides (n = 56) Acephate Anilofos Bromophos-ethyl Bromophos-methyl Butamifos Chlorpyrifos Chlorpyrifos-methyl Cyanofenphos Cyanophos Diazinon Dichlofenthion Dichlorvos Dimethoate Dioxabenzofos Disulfoton EPN Edifenphos Ethion Ethoprophos Fenamiphos Fenchlorphos Fenitrothion Fenitrothion oxon Fensulfothion Fenthion Glyphosate Iprobenfos Isofenphos Isoxathion Leptophos Malathion Mecarbam Methamidophos Methidathion Methyl-parathion Monocrotophos Parathion Phenthoate Phorate Phosalone Phosmet Piperophos Pirimiphos-methyl Profenofos Propaphos Prothiofos Prothiofos oxon Pyridaphenthion Quinalphos Terbufos Tetrachlorvinphos Thiometon Tolclofos-methyl Tolclofos-methyl oxon Trichlorfon Vamidothion 4.
Inhibition of neurite outgrowth in N2a cells by leptophos and carbaryl: effects on neurofilament heavy chain, GAP-43 and HSP-70.
Oxidative desulfuration of chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-methyl, and leptophos by rat brain and liver.
For example, OP-induced delayed neuropathy, first associated with tri-o-cresyl phosphate and then with the insecticide candidate mipafox and the insecticide leptophos, is now known to correlate with or result from inhibition of neuropathy target esterase (NTE) (Johnson and Glynn 2001), which has been identified as a lysophosphatidylcholine hydrolase (Quistad et al.