lethargy


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lethargy

an abnormal lack of energy, esp as the result of a disease

Lethargy

 

a morbid condition similar to sleep and characterized by immobility, absence of reactions to external stimuli, and marked weakening of all external signs of life (mors putativa).

Even the most extreme cases of lethargy can be distinguished from death, thereby precluding the possibility of erroneous burial of the living. Lethargy may be seen in hysteria, general exhaustion, and after intense agitation. An attack is sudden and lasts several hours to many days. Consciousness is usually retained: the patients perceive and remember what is happening around them but they do not react to it. The torpor associated with encephalitis and narcolepsy should be distinguished from lethargy.

lethargy

[′leth·ər·jē]
(medicine)
A morbid condition of drowsiness or stupor; mental torpor.
(nucleonics)
A measure of the energy which has been lost by a neutron, equal to the natural logarithm of the ratio of the initial energy of a neutron to its energy at any given point in the slowing-down process.
References in classic literature ?
I would have got out to make certain on the point, but some leaden lethargy seemed to chain my limbs and even my will.
But at the first words he uttered the comte roused himself from the kind of lethargy in which he had sunk.
Progress in the valley An Indian cavalier The captain falls into a lethargy A Nez Perce patriarch Hospitable treatment The bald head Bargaining Value of an old plaid cloak The family horse The cost of an Indian present
In fact Wolfert Webber was one of those worthy Dutch burghers of the Manhattoes whose fortunes have been made, in a manner, in spite of themselves; who have tenaciously held on to their hereditary acres, raising turnips and cabbages about the skirts of the city, hardly able to make both ends meet, until the corporation has cruelly driven streets through their abodes, and they have suddenly awakened out of their lethargy, and, to their astonishment, found themselves rich men.
In feeling my way I had found many angles, and thus deduced an idea of great irregularity; so potent is the effect of total darkness upon one arousing from lethargy or sleep
A lethargy that comes by right some few score years later.
He entered with a weariness and lethargy which was even more painful than his violence of the morning before, and he dropped heavily into the armchair which I pushed forward for him.
He had a horror of destroying documents, especially those which were connected with his past cases, and yet it was only once in every year or two that he would muster energy to docket and arrange them; for, as I have mentioned somewhere in these incoherent memoirs, the outbursts of passionate energy when he performed the remarkable feats with which his name is associated were followed by reactions of lethargy during which he would lie about with his violin and his books, hardly moving save from the sofa to the table.
Woodcourt who could occasionally divert his attention for a few hours at a time and rouse him, even when he sunk into a lethargy of mind and body that alarmed us greatly, and the returns of which became more frequent as the months went on.
So I forced myself from my lethargy of despair and grief; and this thought, the sweetest thought of all my life, may or may not have been my unrealized stimulus ere now; it was in very deed my most conscious and perpetual spur henceforth until the end.
But the Genius which according to the old belief stands at the door by which we enter, and gives us the lethe to drink, that we may tell no tales, mixed the cup too strongly, and we cannot shake off the lethargy now at noonday.
His gaze upon her seemed to arouse her as from a lethargy.