leucoxene


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leucoxene

[lü′käk‚sēn]
(mineralogy)
A mineral composed of rutile with some anatase or sphene; occurs in igneous rocks, usually as an alteration product of ilmenite.
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The replacement of ilmenite by leucoxene during diagenesis has been known for a long time, but is often ascribed to different stages from early diagenesis in mildly reducing and neutral-acid tropical conditions (Weibel 2003) to late diagenesis (Al-Juboury et al.
Extracted from bowels titanium ores are either dressed with production of selective ilmenite, rutile, anatase, and leucoxene concentrates, containing up to 45-70 % [TiO.
If the mineral material is altered in the described way, the anatase crystals disappear during the recycling and only rounded leucoxene is left from the altered material.
The banded appearance is actually a shear fabric with basalt altered to sericite/muscovite + dolomite +/- leucoxene +/- quartz.
MZI plans to ship 91,000 tonnes a year of leucoxene and zircon concentrate products through the Bunbury port, which is just 10km by road from Picton where the final products will be stockpiled following processing at Doral's Picton mineral separation plant.
Different kinds of mineral alterations taking place in the Devonian sequence during post-sedimentary processes have been studied: formation of authigenic leucoxene, anatase, apatite, pyrite, and goethite, dissolution of garnet, staurolite and kyanite, replacement of magnetite, amphiboles, titanium-bearing minerals and feldspar, formation of authigenic overgrowths of detrital feldspar grains (Kleesment & Paap 1978; Kleesment 1984, 1998).
The TiO2 mineralization is hosted on albitized gabbro and is composed principally of disseminated rutile, rutile veins, a mixture of disseminated rutile and leucoxene as well as minor disseminated sphene (titanite).
Ilmenite, variably altered to leucoxene, is the sole oxide phase in all samples (SEM data not shown).
Image Resources is most encouraged by the drilling results received to date which continue to point to potential for extensive zircon-rich mineralisation with significant high titanium leucoxene and rutile credits.
In this study we compared the relationship between heavy mineral assemblages typical of the Baltic Shield (apatite, amphiboles, pyroxenes, zircon, garnet, epidote, tourmaline, staurolite, sphene, corundum, sillimanite, monazite, magnetite, and ilmenite) and the local bedrock (hematite, leucoxene, pyrite, micas, limonite, phosphates, carbonates, anatase, barite, and chlorite) (Jouzapavicius 1976; Viiding 1976).