leukaemia

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leukaemia

(esp US), leukemia
an acute or chronic disease characterized by a gross proliferation of leucocytes, which crowd into the bone marrow, spleen, lymph nodes, etc., and suppress the blood-forming apparatus
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the distinct morphology of the leukemic components, the diagnosis was confirmed by molecular genetic and flow cytometric studies.
Hence, acute leukemic appendicitis/myeloid sarcoma of the appendage was diagnosed.
Winning team IllumiRNA pitched an idea for a diagnostic platform that profiles individual cells in blood tests, to identify single leukemic cells among a sea of normal cells--like finding a needle in a haystack.
The distribution of gender, leukemic cell morphology, and immune-phenotype did not differ between the patients with ALL and AML.
The interplay between the fused TCF3-HLF oncogenic protein, additional DNA changes and altered gene expression program leads to a re-programming of leukemic cells to an early, stem-cell like developmental stage, although the phenotypic appearance of the cells remains similar.
Methods: The cytotoxicity of MAL-A was evaluated by the MTS-PMS cell viability assay in leukemic cell lines (MOLT3, K562 and HL-60) and compared with solid tumor cell lines (MCF7, A549 and HepG2); further studies then proceeded with MOLT3 vs.
A diagnosis of leukemic pleural effusion was made and a haematologic work up was suggested.
Because all cells contain two copies of each gene, one from the mother and one from the father, these leukemic cells have one mutated gene and one unchanged one that would make the normal regulator.
Mutations in TET2 are known to lead to aberrant changes in DNA methylation patterns that are strongly associated with leukemic transformation and hematopoietic malignancies.
The product is a humanised, Dual-Affinity Re-Targeting bi-specific antibody-based molecule that binds to both CD123 and CD3, antigens expressed on leukemic cells and T lymphocytes, respectively.
It only takes a single mutation in the RUNX1 gene in this type of stem cell to send it down the path to becoming a leukemic stem cell.
The CAR process starts when T cells are extracted from the blood of an individual and outfitted with two powerful features: a receptor on the outer cell surface that recognizes the protein CD19, present on most leukemic cells, and a powerful mechanism inside tile cell that triggers it to expand and proliferate once attached to the targeted protein.