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the division of linguistics in which the vocabulary of a language is studied.

Semantics (semasiology), the study of word formation, etymology, and stylistics are closely linked with lexicology. One of the central problems of lexicology is that of the separability of a word as an independent unit of the vocabulary of a language. Contemporary lexicology, like grammar, is guided by the concept of correlating (interconnected) categories; these correlating lexicological, as well as semantic, categories include monosemy and polysemy, synonymy, and antonymy, and free and bound meanings of words. In studying vocabulary as a system, the lexicologist is looking at the interaction between meanings of words and concepts; concepts are mostly international, whereas the meanings of words are national.

Lexicology is involved with the study of the regularities in the functioning and development of the vocabulary of a language. It elaborates principles for stylistic classification of words; norms of literary word usage in its correlation with popular speech; problems regarding professional words, dialectal words, archaisms, and neologisms; and normalizations of lexicalized word groups (idiomatics and phraseology). The study of sociopolitical and scientific and technical terminology constitutes a special division of lexicology. Lexicology is closely linked with lexicography.


Smirnitskii, A. I. “K voprosu o slove.” Tr. In-ta iazykoznaniia, 1954, vol. 4.
Akhmanova, O. S. Ocherki po obshchei i russkoi leksikologii. Moscow, 1957.
Voprosy teorii iazyka v sovremennoi zarubezhnoi lingvistike. Moscow, 1961.
Shmelev, D. N. Problemy semanticheskogo analiza leksiki. Moscow, 1973.
Ullmann, S. The Principles of Semantics, 2nd ed. Glasgow, 1959.
Hallig, R., and W. von Wartburg. Begriffssystem als Grundlage für die Lexikographie, 2nd ed. Berlin, 1963.
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In general, as a lexicologist doing error analysis among the aliterate Millennials, I find both accurate and useful that St.
25) Such works will then provide the historical lexicologist with valuable material for approaching still unsolved etymological problems.
The problem is, activists are not lexicologists, and Hack Marriage's well-intentioned definition of "marriage" still leaves much to be desired:
Linguists or lexicologists are not required to learn a formal language for DFST definitions.
The manner of his coinages, possible parallels or different coinages elsewhere, the eventual currency or disappearance of his new terms, and so on will be of importance to lexicologists and lexicographers both here and abroad.