life-world


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life-world

( Lebenswelt ) the natural attitude’ involved in everyday conceptions of reality, which includes ‘not only the “nature” experienced…, but also the social world’ (Schutz and Luckmann, The Structures of the Life-World, 1973).

Whereas HUSSERL'S PHENOMENOLOGY bracketed the ‘life-world’, for SCHUTZ it was the major task of SOCIAL PHENOMENOLOGY to uncover the basis of this ‘natural habitat’ of social life (of actors’ social competence), with its central problem of human ‘understanding’. For Schutz it is the ‘taken-for-granted’, ‘routine’ character of the life-world which is most striking (e.g. in contrast with SCIENCE). The ‘stocks of knowledge’ (‘what everybody knows’ – see also MUTUAL KNOWLEDGE) and the ‘interpretive schemes’ employed by social actors in bringing off everyday action, as made apparent by Schutz, become the subject matter of ETHNOMETHODOLOGY. Schutz's thinking has also influenced GIDDENS’ formulation of STRUCTURATION THEORY. see also PRACTICAL CONSCIOUSNESS.

References in periodicals archive ?
In this column, I would like to describe the underlying tenets of Heideggerian Phenomenology, in particular the idea of life-worlds used in this type of research to describe the lived experience of people who are studied.
It seems self-evident, as it is implied by the 'shock experience' kindled by the patient's behaviour, that her conduct must be situated in a life-world that does not (at least, in part) overlap with our own.
On this account I reaffirm my experience that in all the years of frequenting PNG, with a focus on the Yagwoia life-world, I also as a matter of course researched the vicissitudes of senis, divelopmen, taim bilong senis, that have been taking place ever since the gavman (originally colonial) established itself in their abode.
Thus he embraced an even more fundamental shift, namely, from within human society alone (as "another Chisso") to a broader system of the life-world of which human society is a part.
Three chapters are devoted to an account of Husserl's phenomenology of the life-world and his criticism of science, which sets the stage for a critical assessment of the history of economics.
Without the life-world there is no scientific world.
On Hampe's reading, Husserl aims to reconstruct the unknown, untransparent fundament of all knowledge in a reconstructed life-world (the history of science is the key project that will help us attain the transparency and unity of knowledge): the life-world has a systematic and historical priority over any scientific theory or worldview, science and the life-world are compatible and unifiable in some way and at some time, whereas the analysis of the life-world will bring to light the fundamental meanings that made science possible (the technologies and practices of the sciences are opaque knowledge).
Following on from Kant, Habermas locates this foundation in the common language of human rights and rational morals as they appear in the organisation of our life-world (2003: 73-74).
The significance of a secure life-world can hardly be underestimated.
Yet in his attempts to mediate between concept and sensation, the general and the particular, his essayistic cultural critique shared with those of Robert Musil, Benjamin, and Bloch an ideational-sensual focus on the explicitly modern "ordinary" phenomena of the contemporary life-world.
In this article attention will be focused on the description of the life-world of visually impaired adolescents.