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limited

1. (of governing powers, sovereignty, etc.) restricted or checked, by or as if by a constitution, laws, or an assembly
2. US and Canadian (of a train) stopping only at certain stations and having only a set number of cars for passengers
3. Chiefly Brit (of a business enterprise) owned by shareholders whose liability for the enterprise's debts is restricted
4. US and Canadian a limited train, bus, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
One item tapping limitedness of career alternatives was slightly split on the career investments factor.
This, however, would imply a kind of limitedness in the One: its causal activity operates so far and no further.
But in doing so, Posthumanism still kept the traditional image of the human being as existentially-limited and incomplete, and in exactly this limitedness and incompleteness "beautiful" and at the same time tragic-comical, including related issues like its primordial dependency on unavoidable decline and death which was accepted as inevitable and part of the "given" human condition.
Scioli and Biller (2009) discussed some of the types of hopelessness are alienation (feeling of being different from others), forsakenness (feeling of being alone when someone is needed badly in the great time), uninspired (lack of attachment or undervalued), powerlessness (difficulty in achieving goals), subjugation (suppression), limitedness (feelings of failing to do mastery), doom (feeling of despair that one's life is over), captivity (other's or self-imprisonment related to emotions), and helplessness (feelings of being vulnerable).
By this, I do not mean to say that those whose works I've reviewed here "do not care" about Haiti or Haitians, but rather that the texts reveal the limitedness of their insights.
Forgetting our limitedness and living in haughty ideas would not only affect this generation but the next too.
The limitedness of the impact might show that behavioural changes--in this case with regards to safe sex--are possible but difficult to accomplish.
To ask "why" then becomes a means to resist hopelessness, even though the limitedness of language provides at best only a fragile hope.
Starting again from the 1987 canonical definition of the Brundtland report, sustainable development entails at least adopting the twin objectives of: (a) achieving societies where the needs of all individuals are met (and poverty is thus eradicated), which could be understood as societies where a decent life (with secured access to an adequate level of well-being in its various components)--a life worth of human dignity for all--is guaranteed, and (b) achieving this objective in such a way that the needs and decent lives of future generations are also guaranteed (while respecting the limitedness and frailty of the earth or what is often referred to as the "planetary boundaries").
Under the conditions of limitedness of allocated means from public budget for many social and economic goals, issues on self-sufficiency with financial resources are quite urgent.
Then, through the above-described series of revolutions in understanding--which, although they began in the West, gradually spread more and more throughout the whole world-the limitedness of all statements began to dawn on isolated thinkers and increasingly on the middle and even grassroots levels of humankind: the epistemological revolutions of historicism, pragmatism, sociology of knowledge, language analysis, hermeneutics, and finally dialogue.
The Mistura campaign boasts of its awareness of the limitedness of natural resources; its efforts to recycle waste; its concern for biodiversity and "sustainable Peruvian cuisine"; its promotion of whale watching to hinder hunting; and its policy prohibiting harvesting river shrimps and black shells.