sector

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sector

1. Geometry either portion of a circle included between two radii and an arc. Area: ½r2θ, where r is the radius and θ is the central angle subtended by the arc (in radians)
2. a measuring instrument consisting of two graduated arms hinged at one end
3. Computing the smallest addressable portion of the track on a magnetic tape, disk, or drum store

Sector

 

(1) A sector in the plane is a region bounded by two rays issuing from an interior point of a figure and by an arc of its boundary cut off by these rays. In particular, a sector of a circle is bounded by two radii and an arc cut off by the radii. The area of a sector of a circle is equal to lr/2 or πr2α /360, where l is the length of the arc, α is the central angle (in degrees) subtended by the arc, and r is the radius of the circle.

(2) A sector in space is the part of a solid bounded by a conical surface whose vertex is in the solid and by the part of the solid’s surface cut off by the conical surface. A spherical sector is an example of a sector in space.

sector

[′sek·tər]
(computer science)
A portion of a track on a magnetic disk or a band on a magnetic drum.
A unit of data stored in such a portion.
(civil engineering)
A clearly defined area or airspace designated for a particular purpose.
(electromagnetism)
Coverage of a radar as measured in azimuth.
(mathematics)
A portion of a circle bounded by two radii and an arc joining their end points.
(meteorology)
Something resembling the sector of a circle, as a warm sector between the warm and cold fronts of a cyclone.

sector

The smallest unit of data that is written to and read from a storage drive. The initial hard disk sector sizes were 128 and 256 bytes long but were later increased to 512. Eventually, sectors were enlarged to the "Advanced Format" size of 4,096 bytes. See cluster, sector interleave and magnetic disk.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both employees therefore provide services to Employer A's tire and automotive products line of business within the meaning of Treas.
A line of business is deemed to have its own separate management if at least 80 percent of the top-paid employees provide their services exclusively to that line.
The percentage represents the number of top-raid employees who devote substantial services to the line of business in relation to all top-paid employees who provide any services to the line of business.
Of the 1,000 employees who constitute the top 10 percent by compensation of these 10,000 employees, 930 are substantial-service employees with respect to that line of business.
Using the following method, a separate gross profit percentage must be calculated for each line of business.
Example: The aggregate sales of property in an employer's line of business in the prior tax year was $800,000; the property's aggregate cost was $600,000.
Employees--including spouses, dependent children, retirees and some widow/widowers--must work in the same line of business in which the property is being offered for sale.
In order for a line of business to be a "separate" line of business, Prop.
Thus, if an employee is carried on a separate-line-of-business payroll and is entitled to the same pension benefits as all employees in that line of business, the employee should be treated as providing services exclusively to that line of business.
Assigning shared employees to the dominant line of business will minimize the administrative burdens of Prop.
Employees who do not perform substantial services for any one particular line of business (for example, headquarters' employees) must be allocated to lines of business under specific allocation rules.
The dominant line of business method generally is the most attractive method available to allocate residual employees (Regs.