lip-reading

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Related to lip-read: lip reader, Speechreading

lip-reading

a method used by deaf people to comprehend spoken words by interpreting movements of the speaker's lips
References in periodicals archive ?
We are also promoting the following top tips during Deaf Awareness Week: | Make sure you have the person's attention before you start speaking; | Places with good lighting (so that you can be lip-read) and little or no background noise are best for conversations; | Face the person so you can be lip-read and speak clearly, using plain language, normal lip movements and facial expressions; | Check whether the person understands what you are saying and, if not, try saying it in a different way; | Keep your voice down as it's uncomfortable for a hearing aid user if you shout and it looks aggressive, and | Learn finger-spelling or some basic British Sign Language (BSL).
Twenty adults recorded the sentences and, after several weeks, lip-read silent video clips with sentences spoken both by themselves and by nine other participants.
When she shared a flat in New York with 14 other girls, three of the models would bitch about her in front of her - not realising she could lip-read.
Even if the deaf individual depends on using sign language for communication, he/she possibly will be able to lip-read some key words that are spoken.
The Royal National Institute for Deaf People (RNID), a UK charity for people who are deaf and hard of hearing, has said that it is helping to test new technology that would allow people to lip-read over the phone.
Jessica, 35, who learned to lip-read after meningitis left her deaf aged four, had been recruited by the prosecution to decipher video-taped conversations between Fraser and his friend Glenn Lucas.
com) DeepMind have developed an artificial intelligence system that can lip-read better than humans.
He said: "As one person quoted in the report says, being able to lip-read means less isolation and increased participation in day-to-day lives.
She has some hearing but it is poor at higher pitches so she has to lip-read.
By learning to lip-read we can also learn to anticipate conversation and to fill in the gaps left bywords that can't be lip-read.
Mother Deborah said: "He refused to be beaten, and learned to lip-read, even taking part in school plays, a daunting experience as he could hear nothing - not even the sound of his own voice.