Lipomatosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Lipomatosis: lipomas, Pelvic lipomatosis

lipomatosis

[lī‚pō·mə′tō·səs]
(medicine)
Multiple lipomas.
Obesity.

Lipomatosis

 

the excessive deposition of fat in fatty tissue (usually subcutaneous). In some cases the fat is deposited uniformly; in others, there is segmental adiposis of the upper, middle, or lower part of the body. Treatment depends both on the form of lipomatosis and on the causes.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Multiple symmetric lipomatosis may be the consequence of defective noradrenergic modulation of proliferation and differentiation of brown fat cells.
The diagnosis of mediastinal lipomatosis is generally made by observation of mediastinal enlargement on chest graphy and demonstration of intensity changes related to fat on CT or MR imaging.
Diagnosis of Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis (SEL) secondary to the chronic use of steroids was made and the patient underwent T5-7 laminectomy with removal of the epidural fat.
CT scan, however, revealed extensive mediastinal lipomatosis, with compression but no invasion of adjacent structures.
The final pathology was fatty fibroconnective tissue, consistent with epidural lipomatosis.
Crayton HE, Partington CR, Bell CL: Spinal cord compression by epidural lipomatosis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.
Coexistence of XGP and renal replacement lipomatosis as well as XGP with renal TB has been reported.
Imaging studies can distinguish encapsulated fat (progressive nodular lipomatosis and multiple hereditary lipomas, hibernoma) from Madelung disease by means of fat suppression and chemical shift imaging.
Epidural lipomatosis is an uncommon disorder defined as a pathologic overgrowth of normal epidural fat.
The histologic picture corresponds to sheets of hypocellular dense collagen, with interspersed mature fat, small vessels, and entrapped nerve fibers; since it is not composed of fibrocartilage, it resembles more of a fibrolipoma, lipomatosis, scar, or elastofibroma.
To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second case of laryngeal lipoma associated with lipomatosis to be reported in the English-language literature.