lithograph


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lithograph

[′lith·ə‚graf]
(graphic arts)
Originally, a reproduction of a writing sample or a drawing made from a litho stone onto which the writing or drawing had been drawn with a greasy ink or crayon; now, a reproduction from litho metal plates produced by photolithography and run on an offset press.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lowry made just a handful of lithographs, each individually signed by him and numbered from small editions.
The Sotheby's auction house estimates the lithograph is worth between $22,600 and $30,200.
This is one of the first color lithographs that he drew directly onto stone, shortly after Israel's war for independence.
In the fourteen black-and-white lithographs that make up "Untitled," 2004-2006, the figure's body parts appear jumbled in jazzy cubist abstractions.
In 2003, the Aidekman Art Center at Tufts University mounted an exhibition spotlighting his work, titled From Eastport to Rockport: The Lithographs of Stow Wengenroth.
And yet, even as we sense that there is a spatiality to the image, we realize that the lithograph is made up of flat, non-volumetric marks.
Officers also seized thousands of lithographs, supposedly by Dali, who died in 1989, from tourist and art shops in and around the town.
Having already sold some of her first suite of lithographs at the Cultural Village, she decided to go it alone.
There may be nothing from the United States, and while this is too bad, the blackface minstrelsy lithographs from New York around 1830 clearly deserve their own study.
A photo of a mighty lithograph press illustrates this particular specialty of his publishing house.
Designed by former Lakers great Rudy LaRusso, 44, the lithograph is adorned with signatures from many stars such as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, and Gail Goodrich to name a few.