Lobby

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lobby

1. a room or corridor used as an entrance hall, vestibule, etc.
2. Chiefly Brit a hall in a legislative building used for meetings between the legislators and members of the public
3. Chiefly Brit one of two corridors in a legislative building in which members vote
4. a group of persons who attempt to influence legislators on behalf of a particular interest

Lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, hotel, or other structure.

Lobby

 

auxiliary premises in parliamentary and other government buildings, as well as in theaters and concert halls, designed for rest during breaks between sessions or during intermissions. Lobbies are also used for unofficial meetings and exchange of opinions and often serve as work areas for journalists. The expression “lobbying” characterizes behind-the-scenes deals made in capitalist legislative institutions by representatives of the ruling circles who are close to members of the institutions or to high government officials.


Lobby

 

the system of offices and agencies of the major monopolies assigned to legislative bodies of the USA. Lobbies exert direct pressure on legislators and state officials even to the point of bribery for the sake of the companies involved.

lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the heading, "Production Aspects: Lobby Techniques and Finances," Terry presents a thoroughly professional assessment of lobbies in the U.
With a big enough package and a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, the broad electorate can, in principle, be mobilized against a collection of narrow lobbies.
But as the Hmong and many other groups recognized that the federal government was abdicating policy toward smaller states, they seized the opportunity to set up powerful lobbies.
Each group's angling induces its competitors to redouble their efforts, and, as more lobbies dicker and more is invested in lobbying, it becomes all the more important not to be the poor sucker who gets taken to the cleaners.
Visitor Link kiosks in building lobbies connect via the Internet to a secure centralized Kastle database.
He calls instead for devolving more federal programs to the states, so that lobbies would have to disperse their influence around the country, and for competition for federal programs, like vouchers in education.
Although these groups do provide community services, they also seek to advance political agendas: Planned Parenthood lobbies for tax-subsidized abortions; the Interfaith Peace Resource Council advocates nuclear disarmament.
It adds cachet to the lobbies and public spaces of office buildings where office space is available for lease," notes Edward Aretz, Esq.
Fair enough, I suppose; but does he, or anyone, imagine that the Association of Trial Lawyers of America, one of the fattest of the fat-cat lobbies, is a selfless tribune of the public good?
is pleased to announce that it is initiating a program to turn building lobbies into art galleries.
As lobbies press the 104th Congress to give banks greater risk-taking powers, while leaving their deposit insurance safety net intact, it's worth remembering what the S&Ls taught us: When special interests, competitive or cozy, come together to make policy, the outcome rarely reflects the common good.
The use of multiple colors of stone in interior lobbies and public restrooms is also a significant new design trend.