Lobby


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

lobby

1. a room or corridor used as an entrance hall, vestibule, etc.
2. Chiefly Brit a hall in a legislative building used for meetings between the legislators and members of the public
3. Chiefly Brit one of two corridors in a legislative building in which members vote
4. a group of persons who attempt to influence legislators on behalf of a particular interest

Lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, hotel, or other structure.

Lobby

 

auxiliary premises in parliamentary and other government buildings, as well as in theaters and concert halls, designed for rest during breaks between sessions or during intermissions. Lobbies are also used for unofficial meetings and exchange of opinions and often serve as work areas for journalists. The expression “lobbying” characterizes behind-the-scenes deals made in capitalist legislative institutions by representatives of the ruling circles who are close to members of the institutions or to high government officials.


Lobby

 

the system of offices and agencies of the major monopolies assigned to legislative bodies of the USA. Lobbies exert direct pressure on legislators and state officials even to the point of bribery for the sake of the companies involved.

lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
From December 2014 to May 2016, UK financial sector lobbyists had 228 lobby encounters with elite European Commission officials.
There are at least two points to which the conspiracy theorist convinced about their omnipotent Israel lobby argument should pay attention.
Modernizing your lobby is a sound long-term investment.
MNA Board member Sharon Koza with District Two President Gewreka Nobles were active on Lobby Day.
The Israel lobby is not a cabal or conspiracy and is not doing anything wrong.
Medical groups too small to have their own brick and mortar presence in Washington sometimes hire lobby firms.
According to the 1976 Lobby Law, nonprofits with budgets up to $500,000 can spend 20 percent of expenses for lobbying, with a sliding scale as it gets larger:
SAP Public Services has paid Rose & Kindel more than $110,000 to lobby in Sacramento since 2000, as well as $182,000 to lobby the city of Los Angeles since 2003.
She reports wryly that many Arab officials, including Nasser of Egypt, either did not understand what a lobby was or considered lobbying to be an illegal activity.
All delegates to the Congressional City Conference will receive a City Lobby Day kit when they register, which provides background information about the six lobbying priorities and information about how to participate in City Lobby Day.
Armed with huge resources, the fossil fuel lobby launched an intense public relations operation featuring a small group of industry-funded scientists, the "greenhouse skeptics".
In the past, activists criticized AIDSWatch, the national AIDS lobby day, for rebuffing participants who wanted to discuss state AIDS issues with their legislators (instead of focusing on Federal funding alone).