Lobby

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Related to lobbyer: lobbyist

lobby

1. a room or corridor used as an entrance hall, vestibule, etc.
2. Chiefly Brit a hall in a legislative building used for meetings between the legislators and members of the public
3. Chiefly Brit one of two corridors in a legislative building in which members vote
4. a group of persons who attempt to influence legislators on behalf of a particular interest

Lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, hotel, or other structure.

Lobby

 

auxiliary premises in parliamentary and other government buildings, as well as in theaters and concert halls, designed for rest during breaks between sessions or during intermissions. Lobbies are also used for unofficial meetings and exchange of opinions and often serve as work areas for journalists. The expression “lobbying” characterizes behind-the-scenes deals made in capitalist legislative institutions by representatives of the ruling circles who are close to members of the institutions or to high government officials.


Lobby

 

the system of offices and agencies of the major monopolies assigned to legislative bodies of the USA. Lobbies exert direct pressure on legislators and state officials even to the point of bribery for the sake of the companies involved.

lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For habitual lobbyers, past lobbying should be much more important to the extent that it may be the only significant determinant of current lobbying for that group.
Overall, a quick scan of the data suggests that lobbyers are larger, more concentrated in steel production, and have invested less in modernizing their plant and equipment.
In the one-pool model, lobbyers tend to be larger firms that are more concentrated in steel production and that have declining market performance and low levels of investment in productivity improvements.
K = 2), our firms appear to cleanly sort themselves into habitual and occasional lobbyers.
We hypothesize that the first pool contains habitual lobbyers and the second contains occasional lobbyers.