carcinoma

(redirected from lobular carcinoma)
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Related to lobular carcinoma: lobular carcinoma in situ

carcinoma:

see neoplasmneoplasm
or tumor,
tissue composed of cells that grow in an abnormal way. Normal tissue is growth-limited, i.e., cell reproduction is equal to cell death. Feedback controls limit cell division after a certain number of cells have developed, allowing for tissue repair
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.

carcinoma

[‚kärs·ən′ō·mə]
(medicine)
A malignant epithelial tumor.

carcinoma

Pathol
1. any malignant tumour derived from epithelial tissue
2. another name for cancer
References in periodicals archive ?
Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: Spectrum of mammographic, US and MR imaging findings.
Invasive lobular carcinoma is generally believed to have an increased propensity for bilateral disease.
Fine needle aspiration of mammary lobular carcinoma in situ and atypical lobular hyperplasia.
They found that the odds of lobular carcinoma were significantly elevated among women currently receiving oral estrogen (odds ratio, 2.
Cortes J et al Efficacy of eribulin in patients with invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: data from a pooled analysis.
Li and his colleagues averted these drawbacks by assessing postmenopausal women who had taken all the major classes of antihypertensive drugs for long durations, in a large enough sample to include many cases of the two most common histologic subtypes of breast cancer: invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC).
6,7) Pathologic complete response has consistently been associated with good long-term outcome but is achieved in only 10% to 20% of cases, and certain subtypes such as lobular carcinoma show even lower response rates.
Organized by level of difficulty, they relate to magnetic resonance imaging, image-guided biopsy, imaging of high-risk lesions, high-risk patient management, invasive lobular carcinoma, complex cystic cancer, male breast cancer, mucinous carcinoma, desmoid tumors, and other conditions.
Due to the absence of lobules in the normal male breast, invasive lobular carcinoma cases are seen infrequently.
Even though lobular carcinoma constitutes only 10% of breast cancers, it is the commonest breast cancer metastasizing to the colon and rectum (1).
Indeed, the researchers found a 40 percent to 60 percent reduction in the risk of invasive ductal and invasive lobular carcinoma - the two most common types of breast cancer - among women who experienced hot flushes and other symptoms.