locative


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locative

(lŏk`ətĭv) [Lat.,=placing], in the grammar of certain languages (e.g., Sanskrit), the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 referring to location. Nouns in this case are often translatable into English phrases beginning with at, in, or on.
References in periodicals archive ?
The locative alternation is related to certain verbs of putting and some verbs of removing and is further subdivided into different subtypes: the spray/load alternation, the clear alternation, the wipe alternation and the swarm alternation.
1), locative (1), egressive (2) and elative (3) suffixes:
Frith deals with contemporary practices of engaging with locative media, from everyday navigational practices, social networks formed via and grounded in an articulation of location, and the practice of achieving and writing place.
We may also treat the current locative participant exocentric synthetic compound as a subtype of non-possessive bahuvrihi compound.
Smith calls it a "utopian" vision of the world: where the locative vision focuses on place, the utopian affirms the value of being in no place.
Figure 3 outlines the scene as follows: ZeroPoint is the origin of the coordinate system (this is a locative, i.
On the other hand, e-literary criticism has gained much from the recent paradigm of ubiquitous and persuasive computing as the e-literary is turned from stationary computers to mobile screen devices and deploys data from locative mobile networks.
What is important here, however, is the observation that happen is a verb that takes a locative functor as part of its valency and this locative may be temporal.
In that prototypical case, the rule is that the semantic Goal has object status, while the Theme appears in a prepositional phrase--either with oblique (i)n(i) or locative lo, following the same rules as oblique Patients (cf.
Farman then draws parallels taken from the rise of social computing to examine opportunities for intersubjectivity through social norms of reciprocity and relating with others through locative media.
13) This subversive mobility and revolutionary dispersal of the sacred among the early followers of Jesus must be seen in relationship to the monumental public emplacement of the hegemonic locative faith that it resisted and challenged.
The group of suffixes -ele(e)/-l(a)/-ol/-ul are attached to action nouns, as in scendle 'reproach', dreal 'reproof and hwyrfel 'circuit, whirlpool'; agent nouns, as is the case with aeftergengel 'successor', bydel 'herald' and bccslitol 'backbiter'; object/result nouns (scytel 'dart, missile', fyndel 'invention' and bitol 'bridle'); instrumental nouns like sceacel 'shackle', tredel 'sole of the foot' and spinel 'spindle'; and locative nouns such as smygel 'burrow, retreat', stigel 'stile' and setl 'seat'.