lock stepping

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lock stepping

Performing two operations at the same time such as updating two databases or executing two instructions. The term is often used to refer to instruction lock stepping, in which two CPUs execute the same instructions and compare the results. If the results of the two operations are not identical, one of the CPUs is failing, and the system has to perform a series of tests to determine which one is bad.
References in periodicals archive ?
STATE COURT ADOPTION OF FEDERAL CONSTITUTIONAL DOCTRINE: THE FORMS OF LOCKSTEPPING
Michael Solimine and James Walker have argued that this prevalence of lockstepping supports the view that there is "parity" between federal and state courts as effective enforcers of federal constitutional norms.
Many of us have denigrated state constitutional law cases adopting federal constitutional interpretations as a form of kneejerk lockstepping.
Next, a state court might engage in "prospective lockstepping," where it announces that not only for the instant case, but also in the future, it will interpret the state and federal clauses the same.
This is a clear example of a state constitutional decision going well beyond mere case-by-case adoptionism (even if reflective) and adopting a prospective lockstepping approach.
78) As in the Ohio cases of Eastwood Mall and Robinette, those decisions reflect the prospective lockstepping approach under both circumstances of state and federal constitutional textual identity as well as textual distinctiveness.
This is slightly weaker than the strong form of prospective lockstepping just discussed, because the state court may apply the federal test but reach a different outcome.
We can see a variation on the prospective lockstepping "test" approach in the Pennsylvania cases interpreting the various state constitutional equality provisions.
Some state courts, rather than announcing a firm prospective lockstepping methodology, unintentionally send a form of "mixed message" for future cases to the bar and bench.
First, even if the prospective lockstepping approach could be seen as "reflective," it purports to decide too much and to go beyond the court's authority to adjudicate cases.
114) He seems clearly, however, to be referring to case-by-case, or reflective, adoptionism, rather than the prospective lockstepping approach.
115) Ron Collins argued that prospective lockstepping results in the "Problem of the Vanishing Constitution," (116) where the state constitution is rendered a nullity, and the "Problem of Amending Without Amendments," (117) where the court, in effect, amends the state constitution by linking it, prospectively, to federal constitutional analysis.