logic bomb


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Related to logic bomb: Macro virus, RFC 1157

logic bomb

[′läj·ik ‚bäm]
(computer science)
A computer program that destroys data, generally immediately after it has been loaded.

logic bomb

(programming, security)
Code surreptitiously inserted into an application or operating system that causes it to perform some destructive or security-compromising activity whenever specified conditions are met.

Compare back door.

logic bomb

A program routine that destroys data when certain conditions are met; for example, it may reformat the hard disk or insert random bits into data files on a certain date or if a particular employee record is missing from the employee database. Many viruses are logic bombs because they deliver their payload after a specific latency or when a trigger event occurs. See virus, latency and payload.
References in periodicals archive ?
2008, Fannie Mae- A logic bomb from a contract engineer, who had recently been terminated, attempted to delete data on more than 4,000 servers.
Suppose, for example, that Harry plants his logic bomb on a single machine, and that after Harry has disconnected, the program that he loaded transfers a virus to other computers in other states.
A logic bomb is an executable file that, once triggered, executes malicious code that deletes files on a server even during power outages or system reboots.
Logic bomb - A piece of unauthorized computer code, usually delivered via e-mail, which attacks a system after verifying certain conditions within that system.
Malicious codes (logic programs that contain executable statements) take various forms, including viruses, Trojan horses, worms and or logic bombs.
It will also identify any logic bombs hidden in the malware waiting for a trigger to cause damage at a later time.
More basic weapons designed to destroy data at a given time, such as kill switches, logic bombs etc.
It seems to me a datacenter, or group of datacenters, would be inviting targets for logic bombs or for real bombs.
Chris Wysopal, chief technology officer at Veracode, which advises governments on security, said: "If someone is stealing information or planting logic bombs, it's far more difficult to find them.