logical

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logical

1. relating to, used in, or characteristic of logic
2. using, according to, or deduced from the principles of logic
3. Computing of, performed by, used in, or relating to the logic circuits in a computer

logical

(From the technical term "logical device", wherein a physical device is referred to by an arbitrary "logical" name) Having the role of. If a person (say, Les Earnest at SAIL) who had long held a certain post left and were replaced, the replacement would for a while be known as the "logical" Les Earnest. (This does not imply any judgment on the replacement).

Compare virtual.

At Stanford, "logical" compass directions denote a coordinate system in which "logical north" is toward San Francisco, "logical west" is toward the ocean, etc., even though logical north varies between physical (true) north near San Francisco and physical west near San Jose. (The best rule of thumb here is that, by definition, El Camino Real always runs logical north-and-south.) In giving directions, one might say: "To get to Rincon Tarasco restaurant, get onto El Camino Bignum going logical north." Using the word "logical" helps to prevent the recipient from worrying about that the fact that the sun is setting almost directly in front of him. The concept is reinforced by North American highways which are almost, but not quite, consistently labelled with logical rather than physical directions.

A similar situation exists at MIT: Route 128 (famous for the electronics industry that has grown up along it) is a 3-quarters circle surrounding Boston at a radius of 10 miles, terminating near the coastline at each end. It would be most precise to describe the two directions along this highway as "clockwise" and "counterclockwise", but the road signs all say "north" and "south", respectively. A hacker might describe these directions as "logical north" and "logical south", to indicate that they are conventional directions not corresponding to the usual denotation for those words. (If you went logical south along the entire length of route 128, you would start out going northwest, curve around to the south, and finish headed due east, passing along one infamous stretch of pavement that is simultaneously route 128 south and Interstate 93 north, and is signed as such!)

logical

(1) A reasonable solution to a problem.

(2) A higher level view of an object; for example, the user's view versus the computer's view. See logical vs. physical.
References in periodicals archive ?
A logicality index score was calculated by subtracting mean endorsement of logical fallacies from mean endorsement of valid inferences (((MP+ MT)--(AC +DA))/4).
We further examined reasoning responses using the logicality index, which combines endorsement of valid inferences and rejection of invalid inferences.
We examined the zero-order correlations between scores on the IES, indexing the level of psychological distress, scores on the PC-PTSD, indexing the number of PTSD symptom categories, and logicality in reasoning about the three different types of contents.
Results of the correlational analyses show a positive correlation between scores on the IES and logicality in reasoning about abuse-related problems, partialling out neutral reasoning.
Our first hypothesis, based on the neuropsychological literature, was that survivors of abuse would show decreased logicality on neutral contents.
Our second hypothesis was that decreased logicality might not be observed for personally relevant trauma-related contents.
The result concerning a positive association between affective consequences and relative logicality in reasoning about semantically related contents can be linked with previous studies looking at the effect of meaningful personally experienced emotional events on reasoning (Blanchette et al.
While distress was associated with increased relative logicality on abuse-related problems, our study does not allow us to determine the precise cognitive mechanisms that generate this effect.
We use logicality as shortcut to refer to the likelihood of providing a response, which is consistent with the norms of propositional logic.
However, two things suggest that the link between increased logicality and reported distress is likely to be specifically linked with sexual abuse contents.
Despite consistent laboratory findings showing detrimental effects of short-term de-contextualized emotion on reasoning, our results confirm that when participants reason about personally meaningful emotional contents, impaired logicality does not necessarily follow.
In many deductive reasoning tasks, researchers manipulate orthogonally the believability (whether the statement is true or not in the world) of conclusions and their logicality (whether they necessarily follow from the premises).