axis

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Axis,

coalition of countries headed by Germany, Italy, and Japan, 1936–45 (see World War IIWorld War II,
1939–45, worldwide conflict involving every major power in the world. The two sides were generally known as the Allies and the Axis. Causes and Outbreak
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). The expression "Rome-Berlin axis" originated in Oct., 1936, with an accord reached by HitlerHitler, Adolf
, 1889–1945, founder and leader of National Socialism (Nazism), and German dictator, b. Braunau in Upper Austria. Early Life

The son of Alois Hitler (1837–1903), an Austrian customs official, Adolf Hitler dropped out of high school, and
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 and MussoliniMussolini, Benito
, 1883–1945, Italian dictator and leader of the Fascist movement. Early Career

His father, an ardent Socialist, was a blacksmith; his mother was a teacher.
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. The Axis was solidified by an Italo-German alliance in May, 1939. This was extended (Sept., 1940) by a military alliance among Germany, Italy, and Japan—the so-called Berlin Pact, to which Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Slovakia, and Croatia adhered later. The related Anti-Comintern Pact (see CominternComintern
[acronym for Communist International], name given to the Third International, founded at Moscow in 1919. Vladimir Ilyich Lenin feared a resurgence of the Second, or Socialist, International under non-Communist leadership.
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), originally concluded between Germany and Japan in 1936, later had as adherents, besides the Berlin Pact nations, Spain, Denmark, Finland, and the puppet governments of Manchukuo and Nanjing.

axis

1. An imaginary line that usually passes through the center of a body or system and about which the body is often symmetrical or has some form of symmetry. It is the imaginary line about which a rotating body turns or about which an object, such as the celestial sphere, appears to rotate.
2. A reference line on a graph.

Axis

An imaginary straight line, about which parts of a building, or group of buildings, can be arranged or measured.

axis

[′ak·səs]
(anatomy)
The second cervical vertebra in higher vertebrates; the first vertebra of amphibians.
The center line of an organism, organ, or other body part.
(geology)
A line where a folded bed has maximum curvature.
The central portion of a mountain chain.
(graphic arts)
The locus of intersection of two pencils of lines in perspective position.
(mathematics)
In a coordinate system, the line determining one of the coordinates, obtained by setting all other coordinates to zero.
A line of symmetry for a geometric figure.
For a cone whose base has a center, a line passing through this center and the vertex of the cone.
(mechanics)
A line about which a body rotates.

axis

A straight line indicating center of symmetry of a solid or plane figure.

Axis

in World War II, the affiance of Germany, Italy, Japan, etc., opposing the Allies. [Eur. Hist.: Collier’s, VIII, 457]

axis

1
1. a real or imaginary line about which a body, such as an aircraft, can rotate or about which an object, form, composition, or geometrical construction is symmetrical
2. one of two or three reference lines used in coordinate geometry to locate a point in a plane or in space
3. Anatomy the second cervical vertebra
4. Botany the main central part of a plant, typically consisting of the stem and root, from which secondary branches and other parts develop
5. an alliance between a number of states to coordinate their foreign policy
6. Optics the line of symmetry of an optical system, such as the line passing through the centre of a lens
7. Geology an imaginary line along the crest of an anticline or the trough of a syncline
8. Crystallog one of three lines passing through the centre of a crystal and used to characterize its symmetry

axis

2
any of several S Asian deer of the genus Axis, esp A. axis. They typically have a reddish-brown white-spotted coat and slender antlers
References in periodicals archive ?
the long axis led during 20 trials, and the short axis led during 19
Fastener type Property Screw gage 10 Withdrawal Face (25 mm long) Edge Parallel to long axis Perpendicular to long axis Screw gage 10 Lateral Parallel to (50 mm long) resistance long axis Perpendicular to long axis Head pull- through Staple gauge 16 Withdrawal Face (38 mm long, Edge Parallel to 11 mm crown) long axis Perpendicular to long axis Head pull- through Number of Number specimens Panel of tests Fastener type per panel replication per panel Screw gage 10 Withdrawal 10 D 20 (25 mm long) 10 D 20 10 D 20 Screw gage 10 Lateral 10 A 20 (50 mm long) resistance 10 A 20 Head pull- 10 1/2 of B 20 through Staple gauge 16 Withdrawal 10 C 20 (38 mm long, 10 C 20 11 mm crown) 10 C 20 Head pull- 10 1/2 of B 20 through Table 2.
The principal direction of the force is to the right of the vehicle and at nearly a right angle to the long axis of the vehicle, which is outside of the range of allowed deployment for a frontal air bag.
At 117x the galaxy spans 93/4' and is brighter on the eastern side of its long axis along the central 31/4' of its length.
Except for the 15-mm and 18-mm OSB, there were no significant differences between screw lateral resistances parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of the panels.
Since it was not possible to alter the existing rhythm of windows in perimeter walls, Carranza had to work within it, altering the pattern of dividing walls and establishing one central corridor down the long axis.
The steeply dipping fracture and breccia zones trend southwest parallel to the long axis of the property and appear to be extensions of the southwest-trending mineralized structures coming out of the Bingham Canyon pit.
where short axis diameter significantly reduces than the long axis diameter because of contraction of base of heart and displacement of aortomitral curtain towards centre of mitral orifice).
Thomas Daniel, UW professor of biology, one of Williams' advisers and co-author on the paper, said that one of the major discoveries that Williams brought to light is that force is generated in multiple directions, not just along the long axis of muscle as everyone thinks, but also in the radial direction.
The long axis points at us because, after the Moon formed, Earth's strong tidal forces created flexing and internal friction that gradually slowed the lunar spin.
bundles of intracytoplasmic microfilaments with dense bodies that run parallel to the long axis of the cell (stress fibers)
The flexural strength properties (modulus of rupture and modulus of elasticity) of WWCBs with across-ply orientation, in which surface strands were oriented parallel to the long axis of test specimens, were twice those of the randomly oriented control.