Lord

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lord

1. a person who has power or authority over others, such as a monarch or master
2. a male member of the nobility, esp in Britain
3. (in medieval Europe) a feudal superior, esp the master of a manor
4. Astrology a planet having a dominating influence

Lord

1. a title given to God or Jesus Christ
2. Brit
a. a title given to men of high birth, specifically to an earl, marquess, baron, or viscount
b. a courtesy title given to the younger sons of a duke or marquess
c. the ceremonial title of certain high officials or of a bishop or archbishop

Lord

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Lord is an older term for ruler, as in “Mars is the lord (ruler) of Aries.” In the case of the Moon and Venus, traditionally regarded as feminine, the proper term was “lady.” Many astrologers want to retain this term but reserve its use for the ruler of a house. Thus, for example, in a horoscope in which Aries is on the cusp (beginning) of the third house, Mars would be the ruler of Aries and the lord of the third house. Most contemporary astrologers have dropped the term lord and use the term ruler for both relationships. One finds the same distinction between sign and house rulership/lordship in Vedic astrology, where this notion is central to the correct interpretation of a chart.

Lord

 

(1) Originally, in medieval England a general term referring to a feudal landowner (lord of the manor, landlord) and seigneur of his own vassals; the more specific usage referred to a powerful feudal chief and direct supporter of the king—a baron. Gradually, the title of lord was applied collectively to the English upper gentry (dukes, marquesses, counts, viscounts, and barons) and was awarded (from the 14th century) to peers of the kingdom, who formed the upper chamber of the British Parliament (the House of Lords). The title is transferred by male lineage and through seniority but may also be bestowed by the crown (upon recommendation of the prime minister). Beginning in the 19th century, the title was conferred upon not only important landowners, as was previously the case, but upon representatives of large capital, prominent figures in science and culture, and others as well. Prior to 1958, seats in the House of Lords were filled only through inheritance of this title. In 1958 the system of appointment of a part of the membership of the House of Lords by the monarch was introduced. Appointed lords retain their seats for life, but their titles are not inherited. In 1963 hereditary lords received the right to resign their titles.

(2) A component part of the official designation of certain high and local officials of Great Britain—for example, lord chancellor and lord mayor. Lord chancellor—the highest lord of Great Britain—is one of the oldest state offices (established in the 11th century). In contemporary Great Britain the lord chancellor is a member of government and chairman of the House of Lords. For the most part, he carries out the functions of minister of justice. He appoints county judges, heads the Supreme Court, and acts as protector of the great state seal. Lord mayor is a title, retained from the Middle Ages, of the head of local organs of power in London (the City of London) and a number of other large cities (for example, Bristol, Liverpool, and Manchester).

(3) From the 15 to the 17th centuries, a component part of the title of lord protector, which was conferred upon certain high statesmen of England (for example, regents in service of a king who had not yet come of age). In 1653-58, O. Cromwell also bore the title of lord protector.

References in classic literature ?
The great white father," he would say to them in a very lordly manner, as they grovelled at his feet, "is glad to see the Piccaninny warriors protecting his wigwam from the pirates.
Then as you walk round, pulling her, you see little men running about her deck, and sails rise magically and catch the breeze, and you put in on dirty nights at snug harbours which are unknown to the lordly yachts.
With all the lordly majesty of Numa, the lion, he strode straight toward the growling beasts.
Trent's long list of financial successes are too well known to be given here, but who will grudge wealth to a man who is capable of spending it in such a lordly fashion?
Hannaway," she added, turning to the third young man, "to stand there and tell us all in a lordly way that the Prince is no sportsman, as though that mysterious phrase disposed of him altogether as a creature inferior to you and your kind
Bush-dogs were dogs--he recognized them as his kind; but they were somehow different from his own lordly breed, different and lesser, just as the blacks were compared with Mister Haggin, Derby, and Bob.
He had entitled the story "Adventure," and it was the apotheosis of adventure - not of the adventure of the storybooks, but of real adventure, the savage taskmaster, awful of punishment and awful of reward, faithless and whimsical, demanding terrible patience and heartbreaking days and nights of toil, offering the blazing sunlight glory or dark death at the end of thirst and famine or of the long drag and monstrous delirium of rotting fever, through blood and sweat and stinging insects leading up by long chains of petty and ignoble contacts to royal culminations and lordly achievements.
He could appear to strut even while sitting still and he showed that he was a lion of lordly characteristics by the air with which he spat.
Once it was a wild sow which scuttled out of the bracken, with two young sounders at her heels, and once a lordly red staggard walked daintily out from among the tree trunks, and looked around him with the fearless gaze of one who lived under the King's own high protection.
There the boy arrived, handed over his horse with a lordly air to a groom, marched into the house and ordered supper and a bottle of wine.
Love is his tyrant, and lives lordly in him and lawlessly, and being himself a king, leads him on, as a tyrant leads a State, to the performance of any reckless deed by which he can maintain himself and the rabble of his associates, whether those whom evil communications have brought in from without, or those whom he himself has allowed to break loose within him by reason of a similar evil nature in himself.
I am the enemy of all those who, because they possess an ancient name and inherited wealth, consider themselves the God-appointed bullies of the poor, dealing them out meagre charities, lordly patronage, an unspoken but bitter contempt.