lordosis

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Related to lordotic: kyphotic, Lordotic curvature

lordosis

[lȯr‚dō·səs]
(medicine)
Exaggerated forward curvature of the lumbar spine.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, when contracted bilaterally during a symmetrical activity, such as lifting in a lordotic posture, the lumbar fibres of iliocostalis lumborum and longissimus thoracis have the potential to produce large posterior translation and resist anterior shear forces acting on the lumbar spine (Macintosh and Bogduk 1991).
I'm very excited about EOI's FLXfit, as it will enable surgeons to provide gentle correction with an intra-operative expanding device while restoring the patient's anatomy with FLXfit's unique lordotic expansion.
In this sense, a person properly trained in a pelvic tilt maneuver can voluntarily rotate his pelvis a sufficient amount to alter the lumbar lordotic curve (Day et al.
Altered lordotic posture is considered to be unhealthy.
AUSTIN, Texas -- LDR, a privately held medical device company offering innovative spinal implants for both non-fusion and fusion applications, announced that it has received 510(k) clearance from the United States Food and Drug Administration to market the ROI-C Lordotic Cervical Cage.
This will allow you a greater freedom and ease to attain the lordotic curve in your low back with less effort than if your thighs were completely parallel to the floor (i.
The investigators inferred that, in the group fused in kyphosis, compensatory hyperlordosis at the cranial adjacent level led to lordotic contracture of the posterior ligaments.
The system includes a variety of footprints, heights, and lordotic configurations, for a customized fit for each patient.
EOI), a privately held medical device company focused on developing and commercializing innovative expandable devices for spine surgery, is excited to announce that the FLXfit(TM), the world's only 3D articulated and lordotic expandable interbody cage, will be presented at the international ArgoSpine Meeting in Paris.
Other studies are of quite short duration (3-6 weeks) showing positive adaptations for lordotic curve stability, postural control (Yaggie and Campbell, 2006) and trunk power (Cowley et al.
In effect, the stroke is a scooping motion that matches the lordotic curve of the neck.
The physiotherapist should ensure that the patient can do so, and emphasise that a merely straight back is insufficient; the lordotic curve must be present.