temper

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temper

the degree of hardness, elasticity, or a similar property of a metal or metal object

temper

[′tem·pər]
(engineering)
To moisten and mix clay, plaster, or mortar to the proper consistency for use.
(metallurgy)
The hardness and strength of a rolled metal.
The nominal carbon content of steel.
To soften hardened steel or cast iron by reheating to some temperature below the eutectoid temperature.
An alloy added to pure tin to make the finest pewter.

temper

1. To mix lime, sand, and water in such proportions as to make mortar for masonry or plastering.
2. To moisten and mix clay to proper consistency to form bricks, etc., prior to hardening by fire.
3. To bring to a proper degree of hardness and elasticity for use, as steel or other metal, by heat treatment.
4. To impregnate wood fibers or composition board with a drying oil or other oxidizing resin and subsequently to cure with heat so as to improve the strength, hardness, water resistance, and durability of the board.
References in periodicals archive ?
The match, witnessed by the Emir His Highness Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al Thani and President of Brazil Luiz Lula da Silva, saw players of both teams being desperate to break the deadlock and losing temper.
The subjects' most common presentations were of losing temper and poor academic performance.
What this means in practice is that, instead of getting caught up in the usual conflict, shouting, ordering around, being ignored and then losing tempers, change your behaviour so that your children know you mean business.