Pedicularis

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Pedicularis

 

a genus of plants of the family Scrophulariaceae. They are perennial or, less commonly, annual or biennial hemiparasitic herbs. The leaves are pinnatisect or pinnately lobed; the lower leaves form a rosette. The irregular flowers, which are pink-violet, purple, yellow, or white, are in spicate or racemose inflorescences. The corolla is two-lipped; the fruit is a capsule.

There are approximately 600 species of Pedicularis, distributed in the northern hemisphere, primarily in the Himalayas and China; one species is encountered in South America. More than 110 species are found in the USSR, primarily in Middle Asia, on dry rocky slopes and in alpine and subalpine meadows. The rattle, or red rattle (Pedicularis palustris), is widespread in the northern and central parts of the European SSR. It grows in swamps and along various bodies of water. All parts of the plant are toxic: they contain the glycoside aucubin (rhinanthin). The rattle is used as an insecticide. A number of species of Pedicularis are cultivated as ornamentals.

References in periodicals archive ?
Moose, bear, and the Furbish lousewort, an endangered plant found only along the Upper St.
mysticetus), whooping crane (Grus americana), Eskimo curlew (Numenius borealis), Kirtland's warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii), leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), and Furbish lousewort (Pedicularis furbishiae) as endangered.
That would be a truly unnatural act, of course--one no selfrespecting tree, furbish lousewort, or moose would consider.
In the understory of deciduous forests in Ontario, Laverty and Plowright (1988) recorded enhanced fruit and seed set in mayapples (Podophyllum peltatum) that were associated with lousewort (Pedicularis canadensis) than in those far from lousewort.
Abundant wild flowers include marsh and spotted orchids, lousewort, yellow rattle, bird's-foot trefoil, meadow vetchling, tufted vetch, devil's-bit scabious, betony and knapweed, which attract hosts of bees and butterflies such as ringlets, meadow and hedge browns, small skippers and common blues.