lo-fi

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Related to low-fi: Lofi

lo-fi

(LOw-FIdelity) Poor sound quality. The term was coined in the 1980s. Contrast with hi-fi. See shit-fi.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Whether a metallic jacquard stand-out print, or a low-fi ripped denim one, throw on a simple knit and you've got the perfect day-to-night outfit.
Behind the music: From the late '50s to the late '80s, the low-fi studio of the tiny Boddie Recording Company was responsible for nearly 300 albums and singles, most of which sold fewer than 1,000 copies.
Twenty-three-year-old writer-director Hirohara Satoru's pic, which won the Dragons & Tigers Award for Young Cinema at the Vancouver fest, won't take any prizes for technical prowess, its low-fi images even stuttering at many points.
Terrence McNally was 10 years old when he heard his first Puccini: a collection of love duets played by his fifth-grade teacher on a low-fi phonograph.
A low-fi version of The Very Thing opened the show - Ross and wife Lorraine McIntosh accompanied only by piano, the simplicity of the arrangement exposing the calibre of their voices.
And, yes, the Duplass brothers are darlings of that circuit, leaders of the low-fi filmmaking movement that has been labeled "mumblecore.
Brand New contains enough of Ramos-Nishita's trademark low-fi distortion and fuzzed-out keyboard riffs to keep longtime fans happy but is more interesting to listen to for his turns as a lyricist and singer.
One of their early low-fi efforts, Caught Redhanded, had the distinction of being among the last singles championed by John Peel, who included it in his final Record Box and gave the band a namecheck in his autobiography Margrave of The Marshes.
In-house blogs are essentially a low-fi medium, which lose much of their value if they are seen as PR tools or as branches of a corporate entity.
DIY: The Rise Of Low-Fi Culture" explores these alternative channels, interviewing key writers, promoters, musicians and others involved in radical alternative movements and publishing.
That involved Jean Paul making three successive trips to Toliary, the main town in the south west of Madagascar, to conduct auditions at the Andranangy studios, a rudimentary facility usually used to produce the ubiquitous low-fi cassettes sold in local markets.
So goes Jeffrey Strouth's most self-summarizing bon mot from American Fabulous, a low-fi documentary of a garrulous gay man "spontaneously performing" the story of his tumultuous life as he's driven around his native Ohio in the backseat of a '57 Cadillac.