loxodrome


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

loxodrome

[′läk·sə‚drōm]
(mapping)

rhumb line

rhumb line
A rhumb line crosses all meridians at the same angle.
A line on the surface of the earth that cuts all meridians at the same angle. It appears as a curved line on the surface of a sphere. Only one such line may be drawn through any two points. Although this is not the shortest distance, the direction is constant. Normally, flights of less than 1,000 NM distance follow the rhumb-line track, whereas flights of a longer distance follow the great-circle track. Also called an equiangular spiral, loxodrome, loxodromic curve, or Mercator track.
References in periodicals archive ?
The distances from the Beaufort sites (M, N, O) to Nova Scotia are about 5000 km (Table 5), with orthodromes 5% shorter than geographic loxodromes.
Figure 14a is a Mercator projection, showing loxodromes as straight lines.
14b) and 145 [degrees] and 138 [degrees], respectively, along loxodromes (Fig.
Loxodromes between the New Siberian Islands and the three main New Zealand/Australian areas in Figure 14 have bearings towards approximately 172 [degrees], 180 [degrees], and 191 [degrees, while the rather similar orthodromes have departure bearings from the New Siberian Islands at 157 [degrees], 180 [degrees], and 203 [degrees, respectively.
The flight to the Bering Sea region must represent a detour since there are no major winter quarters to be found along either orthodromes or loxodromes with bearings around 105 [degrees] from northeast Siberia (Fig.