luciferin


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

luciferin

[lü′sif·ə·rən]
(biochemistry)
A species-specific pigment in many luminous organisms that emits heatless light when combined with oxygen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Particles releasing luciferin and coenzyme A were designed to accumulate in the extracellular space of the mesophyll, an inner layer of the leaf, while the smaller particles carrying luciferase enter the cells that make up the mesophyll.
Fluorescent, protein-based sensors do not require the addition of an exogenous luciferin substrate, and they offer ease of manipulation at the DNA level and subsequent ease of expression in cells and in vivo.
The Russian team discovered that bioluminescent mushrooms employ a different type of luciferin from the eight other classes that are known to be used by animals and microbes.
The luciferin depends on the function value at the current position of the glowworm, so the position of glowworms changes and the luciferin updates accordingly in the each iteration.
The genes coding for the luciferase [alkanal monooxygenase subunit alpha (luxA) [9] and alkanal monooxygenase subunit beta (luxB)] are linked to those coding for the fatty acid reductase complex [fatty acid reductase (luxC); acyl transferase (luxD); and acyl-protein synthetase (long-chain-fatty-acid-luciferin-component ligase) (luxE)], which catalyzes the production of luciferin from the fatty acid pool (11).
Cellular ATP levels were quantified with a luciferin and luciferase-based assay [31] .
One example is bioluminescence in which the luciferase enzyme expressed by the target cell acts on injected luciferin.
They used a fire-fly protein luciferase, an enzyme which, with its substrate luciferin, leads to light emission--so the reaction can be followed well (it has a history as an assay for adenosine triphosphate).
In the presence of dioxins, the enzyme luciferase is produced, and its reaction with luciferin can be detected by measuring relative light units on a luminometer.
A firefly's light is produced by a chemical reaction involving a special protein, a pigment called luciferin, and oxygen.
Fireflies, anglerfish, and other creatures create light by releasing the chemical luciferin, which combines with the enzyme luciferase to create light.
The bottom layer contains a compound known as luciferin and a reaction-instigating enzyme called luciferase.