lustre


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lustre

(US), luster
1. 
a. a shiny metallic surface on some pottery and porcelain
b. (as modifier): lustre decoration
2. Mineralogy the way in which light is reflected from the surface of a mineral. It is one of the properties by which minerals are defined

LUSTRE

(A French acronym for Synchronous real-time Lucid). Real-time dataflow language for synchronous systems, especially automatic control and signal processing. A Lucid subset, plus timing operators and user-defined clocks.

Designed for automatic control applications. It is based on the idea that automatic control engineers use to analyse, and specify their systems in terms of functions over sequences (sampled signals). It thus seems both safe and cost effective to try to compile directly those descriptions into executable code. A lot of work has been done, so as to get efficient compilation, and also in formal verification. The language has been used in nuclear plant control, and will be used in aircraft control.

["Outline of a Real-Time Data-Flow Language", J.-L. Bergerand et al, Proc IEE-CS Real Time Systems Symp, San Diego, IEEE Dec 1985, pp. 33-42].

["LUSTRE: A Declarative Language for Programming Synchronous Systems", P. Caspi et al, Conf Rec 14th Ann ACM Symp on Princ Prog Langs, 1987].
References in classic literature ?
The mother's impassioned state had been the medium through which were transmitted to the unborn infant the rays of its moral life; and, however white and clear originally, they had taken the deep stains of crimson and gold, the fiery lustre, the black shadow, and the untempered light of the intervening substance.
If it sparkles as brightly as ever go straight on, but if its lustre is dimmed choose another path.
Here Troy was," said he; "here my ill-luck, not my cowardice, robbed me of all the glory I had won; here Fortune made me the victim of her caprices; here the lustre of my achievements was dimmed; here, in a word, fell my happiness never to rise again.
If momentary rays of glory break forth from the gloom, while they dazzle us with a transient and fleeting brilliancy, they at the same time admonish us to lament that the vices of government should pervert the direction and tarnish the lustre of those bright talents and exalted endowments for which the favored soils that produced them have been so justly celebrated.
It was possible, I reflected, that a mere different arrangement of the particulars of the scene, of the details of the picture, would be sufficient to modify, or perhaps to annihilate its capacity for sorrowful impression; and, acting upon this idea, I reined my horse to the precipitous brink of a black and lurid tarn that lay in unruffled lustre by the dwelling, and gazed down--but with a shudder even more thrilling than before--upon the remodelled and inverted images of the grey sedge, and the ghastly tree-stems, and the vacant and eye-like windows.
Thus by degrees the intellectual lustre of the Priestly Order would wane, and the road would then lie open for a total destruction of all Aristocratic Legislature and for the subversion of our Privileged Classes.
At last, upon a pledge that each should apply to his family with a common frankness, this convention of unhappy young asses broke up, went down the common stair, and in the grey of the spring morning, with the streets lying dead empty all about them, the lamps burning on into the daylight in diminished lustre, and the birds beginning to sound premonitory notes from the groves of the town gardens, went each his own way with bowed head and echoing footfall.
One more practiced in the arts of great cities would have hid her blushes beneath a veil, or, at least, have cast down her thickly fringed lashes, so as to have concealed the liquid lustre of her animated eyes; but, on the contrary, the delighted girl looked around her with a smile that seemed to say: "If you are my friends, rejoice with me, for I am very happy.
Nobody could bargain with greater obstinacy, and as for cleanliness, the lustre on her brass sauce-pans was the envy and despair of other servants.
One had listened to a traveller's tale of this marvellous stone in his own distant country, and had immediately been seized with such a thirst for beholding it as could only be quenched in its intensest lustre.
The first was the great fire of Boston in 1760, when the glare from nearly three hundred buildings, all in flames at once, shone through the windows of the Province House, and threw a fierce lustre upon the gilded foliage and lion's head of our old chair.
On such an evening Antonio could do nothing but converse of my absent friend; he dwelt on the indescribable grace of your person, the lustre of your eye, and the vermilion of your lips, until exhausted language could furnish no more epithets of rapture: then the transition to your mind was natural and easy; and it was while listening to his honied accents that I thought my Julia herself was talking.