lute

(redirected from lutanist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to lutanist: lutist

lute,

musical instrument that has a half-pear-shaped body, a fretted neck, and a variable number of strings, which are plucked with the fingers. The long lute, with its neck much longer than its body, seems to have been older than the short lute, existing very early in the Egyptian and Middle Eastern cultures, whence the word lute derives. The short lute was known in Spain as early as the 10th cent., having been brought there by Arabs. Its greatest development came in the 15th cent. The lute was the most popular English and European instrument of the Renaissance. During these periods it amassed a vast literature. In the 17th cent. a larger form (the archlute) was developed; it gave rise to the theorbotheorbo
, large lute of the baroque period. It had an extra set of bass strings, not stopped on a fingerboard as the regular set are but plucked as open strings. These made it more suitable for playing baroque music than was the lute. It originated in the late 16th cent.
..... Click the link for more information.
 and to the chitarrone, which was supplanted by the Spanish vihuela and the modern guitarguitar,
musical instrument related to the lute, modern guitars normally having six strings that are plucked with the fingers or strummed with a pick. Earlier versions had pairs of strings like the lute.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Lute music is notated in tablaturetablature
, in music, a generic system of musical notation indicating actions that the player must take, rather than "representing" the music itself that will result from those actions. Tablatures have been in use in the West since the early 14th cent.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Lute

 

a plucked stringed instrument.

The lute has an oval, convex body, short and wide neck with a pegbox bent back at an angle, and from six to 16 strings (sometimes as many as 24). The upper sounding board is flat and has a large sound hole. The tuning of the strings is based on a system of different sequences of intervals of a fourth and third (depending on the piece being performed).

The lute originated from the Arab-Iranian al’ud (earliest information about which dates from the third to the seventh century), which was introduced in Spain and Sicily at the end of the Middle Ages. From Spain and Sicily a somewhat modified instrument, called a lute, spread to Western European countries, and later to Eastern Europe. The art of lute-playing reached its height in the 16th and 17th centuries. By the middle of the 18th century, the lute had been supplanted by the guitar.

lute

[lüt]
(materials)
A substance, such as cement or clay, for packing a joint or coating a porous surface to produce imperviousness to gas or liquid.

lute

1. A scraper having a straight cutting edge; used to level plastic concrete.
2. A bricklayer’s straightedge used for striking off clay from a brick mold.

lute

1
an ancient plucked stringed instrument, consisting of a long fingerboard with frets and gut strings, and a body shaped like a sliced pear

lute

2
Dentistry a thin layer of cement used to fix a crown or inlay in place on a tooth
References in periodicals archive ?
It was the lutanist who recognised him first - and immediately set up a plangent twanging.
The authors' categories include musician, singer, opera performer [ = chorister], ballad singer, whistler, sibilist, instrumentalist, violinist, fiddler, violist, violoncellist, double bass player, bass viol player, flutist, recorder player, piper, fifer, union pipe player, oboist, bassoonist, clarinetist, basset horn player, bagpiper, trumpeter, horn player, trombonist, drummer, kettledrummer, harpsichordist, player on the virginal, organist, pianist, dulcimer player, player on musical glasses, harpist, lutanist, theorbo player, guitarist, mandolin player, jew's harp player, trumpet marine player, bell ringer, handbell ringer, conductor, musical director, opera director, and bandleader.
The lutanist who had been plucking fiercely on his instrument roused himself to a positive frenzy; and the dancing girls began to ride in such a way that young Arthur nearly fell from the precarious ladder which barely held his already quite considerable weight.