lymphokine

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lymphokine

[′lim·fə‚kīn]
(immunology)
A cytokine released from T lymphocytes after contact with an antigen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of these defector molecules, migration inhibition factor (MIF) a lymphokine, inhibit the migration of macrophages in the same culture medium [11].
TH1 and TH2 cells: different patterns of lymphokine secretion lead to different functional properties.
Table 2-3 Some Types of Cytokines and Their Functions Type Source Function Interleukin-1 Monokine produced by Activates B and activated macrophages T lymphocytes; mediates inflammation Interleukin-2 Lymphokine produced by Growth factor for B and helper T cells T lymphocytes; enhances cytotoxic effects of nonkiller (NK) cells Interferon Lymphokine produced by Activates macrophages; helper and suppressor promotes B- and T-cell T cells differentiation; activates neutrophils and NK cells Tumor necrosis Monokine produced by Mediator of inflammation factor activated macrophages Table 2-4 Phases of Acquired Immunity Phase Action Recognition Exposure to a specific antigen resulting in selective activation and expansion of those lymphocytes with antigenic receptors specific for that antigen.
Helper T-cells produce powerful chemicals, called lymphokines, that mobilize other immune system substances and cells.
Korbet cites the presence of a circulating permeability factor such as lymphokines or cytokines as possible culprits in idiopathic disease.
Uromodulin (Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein): a renal ligand for lymphokines.
The second type of reaction, ACD, is a delayed hypersensitivity reaction (type IV) thought to be a result of exposure to the accelerators, which can lead to the activation and release of lymphokines by sensitized T lymphocytes rather than to the latex itself (Atkins 1999).
The stimulated macrophages secrete chemotactic factors such as lymphokines, which then attract T-helper (T4) lymphocytes.
Immune System: a complex network of interacting cells, cell products, and cell-forming tissues that protects the body from pathogens [disease-producing agents such as viruses and bacteria] and other foreign substances, destroys infected and malignant cells, and removes cellular debris; the system includes the thymus, spleen, lymph nodes and lymph tissue, stem cells, white blood cells, antibodies, and lymphokines [any lymphocyte product that is not an antibody but may participate in the immune response through its effect on the function of other cells].

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