granulomatosis

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granulomatosis

[‚gran·yə‚lō·mə′tō·səs]
(medicine)
Any disease characterized by multiple granulomas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is included in this review because it is an EBV driven LPD that shares some morphologic and clinical features with EBV associated DLBCL and may progress to DLBCL.
Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is an angiocentric and angiodestructive lymphoproliferative disease involving extranodal sites, comprised of [EBV.
Lymphomatoid granulomatosis (angiocentric immunoproliferative disorder) is an angioinvasive and angiodestructive lymphoid process that commonly presents in extranodal sites, often in the lung, but may involve other organs including the skin and central nervous system.
The infiltrate in lymphomatoid granulomatosis consists mainly of small T-lymphoid cells with slightly irregular nuclear outlines admixed with a variable number of inflammatory cells including histiocytes and plasma cells (Figure 6, A through C).
Establishing the diagnosis of lymphomatoid granulomatosis usually requires an open lung or video-assisted thoracoscopic biopsy; because of the focal nature of lymphomatoid granulomatosis and the fact that it is not bronchocentric, a low diagnostic yield with bronchoscopic or transbronchial biopsies is likely.
Fatal haemoptysis in a case of lymphomatoid granulomatosis treated with rituximab.
Lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LyG) is an EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disorder that typically affects adults with a known immunodeficiency, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), iatrogenic immunosuppression, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.
Patients with lymphomatoid granulomatosis, a lymphoma of large B cells, may present with fever, weight loss, neurologic deficits, and respiratory manifestations.
Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is recognized as an angiocentric and angiodestructive disease arising in a variety of extranodal sites.
5-8) Reported pulmonary manifestations of IgG4-related sclerosing disease have included fibroinflammatory masses, the plasma cell-rich variant of inflammatory pseudotumor, an interstitial pneumonitis resembling idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), (7) and some lesions formerly thought to represent grade I lymphomatoid granulomatosis.
The most important differential diagnosis for NLH is mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma but it also needs to be differentiated from lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, and IPT or IMT.
Past awards include the Arthur Purdy Stout Society for Surgical Pathologists (1995), the John Brinton Hill Award (1995), and the Charles Carrington Memorial Prize (1996) received for his work in lymphomatoid granulomatosis, the spectrum of p53 mutations in lung cancer, and the role of apoptosis in acute lung injury.