maenad


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maenad

, menad
Classical myth a woman participant in the orgiastic rites of Dionysus; bacchante
References in periodicals archive ?
Representation of Maenads on Archaic Red-Figure Vases," JHS 80, 7887.
Apart from goddess Tyche, researchers also found a wonderfully etched relief of a maenad, one of a group of female followers of Dionysus, the god of wine on a bone plate.
The maenad with or without weapons was a complex character that was the product of overlapping ideas based in Greek thought, religion, art, and theater.
Hither the sound has borne us--to the realm Of Demogorgon, and the mighty portal, Like a Volcano's meteor-breathing chasm, Whence the oracular vapor is hurled up Which lonely men drink wandering in their youth And call truth, virtue, love, genius or joy-- That maddening wine of life, whose dregs they drain To deep intoxication, and uplift Like Maenads who cry loud, Evoe
Rather than depicted in action as on the olpe, he is at leisure, in symposion mode and being entertained by standard members of his entourage: satyrs, maenads, Pan and Eros.
The She-Wolf is called that by the village women because, a kind of maenad with her "arrogant breasts," coal-black eyes, and red lips, always roaming about, she has devoured "all their sons and husbands" and even the village priest, insatiably.
The DSTC's MAENAD project developed a search, retrieval, and presentation system for OAI that searches for and retrieves mixed-media resources on a particular topic, determines the semantic relationships between the retrieved objects, and combines them into a coherent multimedia presentation, based on their relationships to each other (Little, Guerts, & Hunter, 2002).
As Fritz Saxl noticed in his lifelong study of Titian, the artist borrowed, here as elsewhere, from figures on Roman sarcophagi, altars and friezes: the bearer and the server of the wine-tub, the dancing Maenad and the tipsy piddling putto.
At other points, Caterina seems a maenad, overcome with primitive fury.
The pagan Dionysian series, however, is indifferent: the male god becomes each or any or all of the female variants, his maenad worshippers.
Consequently, Carlyle views this conduct as role reversals of the functions of men and women in society and an example of disorder or chaos, an echo of Shires' conception of the maenad (148).
a maenad and silenos--mythological followers of Dionysos--sweep along in a lively dance.