magnesium fluoride


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magnesium fluoride

[mag′nē·zē·əm ′flu̇r‚īd]
(inorganic chemistry)
MgF2 White, fluorescent crystals; insoluble in water and alcohol, soluble in nitric acid; melts at 1263°C; used in ceramics and glass. Also known as magnesium flux.
References in periodicals archive ?
Global Magnesium Fluoride Industry Report 2015 and Market Research Report on Global and Chinese Magnesium fluoride Industry, 2009-2019 are new additions to the inorganic chemicals' market intelligence collection at RnRMarketResearch.
9] Sanaz Sepehri and Haleh Kangarlou, Producing and Investigating Structural Properties of the Semiconductor Thin Layer of Magnesium Fluoride on Glass, Journal of Applied Science and Agriculture, 9 (1) (2014) 227-230.
The family of larger aperture optics consists of two different birefringent crystals - crystalline quartz and magnesium fluoride (MgF2) - each with a highly efficient broadband antireflection coating, in an air-spaced design.
In the ensuing decades, magnesium fluoride has been joined by many other "rare earths" in very thin layers.
The researches tested this process using different materials such as, magnesium fluoride, chalcogenide glass and even tape.
The compound induces the production of magnesium fluoride, which mixes with magnesium oxide to produce a solid solution that takes the form of a thin, flexible layer on the magnesium metal, preventing further reaction between the magnesium and the coating.
It is also comprised of a second spacer layer which does not provide significant incident angle dependent variable path-length difference, the spacer layer being selected from the group consisting of silicon dioxide, magnesium fluoride, magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, titanium oxide, titanium hydroxide and iron oxide.
The trap detector has two, 10 mm diameter, Ge photodiodes and a 15 mm diameter, concave mirror (40 mm focal length) of aluminum coated with magnesium fluoride.
These pigments are flakes of aluminum, magnesium fluoride, and chromium.
Some manufacturers use magnesium fluoride as a multi-coat, while others apply coatings of rare earth salts such as zirconium oxide, cerium oxide and aluminum oxide.
But a new laboratory study suggests that thin layers of magnesium fluoride might undergo significantly more long-term radiation damage in space than previously thought.
This new coating can be deposited on silica, magnesium fluoride, calcium fluoride, and crystal quartz," states Cailong Bao, Research and Development Manager of CVI Laser, LLC.