magnetic


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magnetic

[mag′ned·ik]
(electromagnetism)
Pertaining to magnetism or a magnet.
References in classic literature ?
exclaimed Hester Prynne, fixing her deep eyes on the minister's, and instinctively exercising a magnetic power over a spirit so shattered and subdued that it could hardly hold itself erect.
There existed between him and the old church so profound an instinctive sympathy, so many magnetic affinities, so many material affinities, that he adhered to it somewhat as a tortoise adheres to its shell.
A sustained yell of vengeful fury came floating up to the window at which the bishop stood, and enveloped him in a magnetic field.
But Francine--still influenced by the magnetic attraction which drew her to Emily--did not conceal from herself that she had offered the provocation, and had been therefore the person to blame.
I can even perceive some faint possibility of truth in the explanation which you described as the mesmeric theory-- that what I saw might be the result of magnetic influence communicated to me, as I lay between the remains of the murdered husband above me and the guilty wife suffering the tortures of remorse at my bedside.
Is there some potent magnetic emanation from Number One which Number Two doesn't possess?
She rebelled, as it were, against a certain magnetic element in the artist's nature, which he exercised towards her, possibly without being conscious of it.
This storage technology will easily out perform magnetic hard drives, rapidly surpassing the data-density limit of magnetic storage and, theoretically, will provide the ability to store many thousands of gigabytes on a CD-ROM-sized disk.
Check the status of magnetic media or electronic submission;
The Achilles' heel of thermoplastic PB magnets is their inability to equal the magnetic power of conventional magnets.
The key to IBM's new data storage breakthrough is a three-atom-thick layer of the element ruthenium, a precious metal similar to platinum, sandwiched between two magnetic layers.
Stevens (3) noted that a key characteristic of modern industrial society is the increased use of electric power, with its associated exposure to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMF) and the presence of high levels of light at night (LAN).