Magnetic Shell

magnetic shell

[mag′ned·ik ′shel]
(electromagnetism)
Two layers of magnetic charge of opposite sign, separated by an infinitesimal distance.

Magnetic Shell

 

an infinitely thin double magnetic layer formed by magnetic dipoles. Under certain conditions the magnetic field of a magnetic shell is equivalent to the field of a direct current flowing along the contour of a shell. The equivalence between a magnetic shell and a closed linear current is used in electrotechnical calculations.

References in periodicals archive ?
Today we know that these lights, first called the aurora borealis or "dawn of the North" by Galileo Galilei, form when gusts of charged, energetic particles from the Sun breach Earth's protective magnetic shell and hit the planet's atmosphere.
The magnetic shell density is narrower and weaker than the nuclear shell density.
A shock wave generated by the storm rammed into the magnetic shell that surrounds Earth, giving enough of a kick to gas trapped in the ionosphere, a layer of the upper atmosphere, to expel several hundred tons of gas, mainly oxygen.
The effects of magnetic shell permeability changes and magnetic gap variations are eliminated as temperature dependent elements in a well designed filter structure.