magnetic wave


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magnetic wave

[mag′ned·ik ′wāv]
(solid-state physics)
The spread of magnetization from a small portion of a substance where an abrupt change in the magnetic field has taken place.
References in periodicals archive ?
Observations by two spacecraft suggest that magnetic waves generated inside the sun provide the push.
A Broad Area Wrap, containing 15 powerful magnetic wave magnets, ideal
His team, which includes researchers from the National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the Research Institute in Astrophysics and Planetology, used combined data from a telescope based in Hawaii and NASA's solar satellite to investigate powerful magnetic waves, known as Alfven waves, where the Sun's wind originates.
This study used NBS to stimulate the brain with magnetic waves using a navigation system akin to a GPS map.
Michinery Kabuto in 2006 showed an increased risk of leukemia, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia, among children exposing to high magnetic waves [7,8].
The treatment involves using magnetic waves to stimulate specific areas of the brain to improve mental health, the spokeswoman said.
The key may be magnetic waves long sought but only recently spotted, an international team reports in the July 28 Nature.
Workers in the airport control tower - controllers, Met Services' staff and CyTA technicians - claim their health is at risk from daily exposure to the magnetic waves emitted by the archways, and want to be exempted from walking through them.
Magnetic waves are transmitted through the earth by the system.
Being an electronics engineer I would say if the magnetic waves generated by mobile phone technology are dangerous, then sticking a telephone next to your brain and transmitting is probably more dangerous than being within 400m of a mast.
The magnetic waves travel through structurally weak areas of the pipe at a faster rate and allow for predictions to be made on the remaining life of the pipe.