magnetosomes


Also found in: Medical.

magnetosomes

[mag′ned·ə‚sōmz]
(microbiology)
Intracellular, membrane-bound iron mineral crystals, often magnetite, that enable magnetotactic bacteria to orient and move in the direction of the earth's magnetic field, in marine environments, magnetosomes may contain the iron sulfide mineral greigite.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Magnetosomes are so needed for MTB that their formation is strictly regulated at the gene level, all related genes concentrated in a region of the MTB chromosome called the magnetosome island (MAI) (Ullrich et al.
Thanks to that, cells can create less magnetosomes to achieve the same orientation energy (Thomas-Kerpta et al.
Schuler, "Formation of magnetosomes in magnetotactic bacteria," Journal of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, vol.
Schuler, "A large gene cluster encoding several magnetosome proteins is conserved in different species of magnetotactic bacteria," Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol.
a chain of magnetosomes imparting to the MTB a magnetic moment so that the bacterium can align itself to an external magnetic field); (ii) propellers as the propulsion engines accelerating the MTB to move towards a targeted destination (i.
A detailed look at its DNA revealed that BW-1 has two sets of magnetosome genes, unlike other such bacteria, which produce only one mineral and have only one set of magnetosome genes.
Synchrotron technology has allowed scientists to 'see' the magnetism of magnetosomes within individual bacteria cells, which sheds light on how the tiny magnets grow in response to genetic and environmental factors.
However, the new study claims that previous modelling methods were inaccurate and new calculations prove that all known magnetosomes do posses the right magnetic qualities needed to facilitate navigation.
Consider the bacteria equipped with the famous magnetosomes, and suppose that (as the story is usually told) the tuggings of the magnetosomes have representational content.
Inside these creatures, minuscule chains of crystal particles called magnetosomes serve as compasses that point the way to relatively safe and nutrient-rich habitats.
Discusses magnetic nanoparticles including nanowires, nanotubes, zero-dimensional nanosperes and naturally existing magnetosomes.
To see how these distinctions operate, consider the example Millikan uses to discuss the disambiguation problem: the example of bacterial magnetosomes first discussed by Dretske (1986).