Mahonia

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Mahonia

 

a genus of plants of the family Berberidaceae. They are evergreen shrubs or small trees. The large leaves are oddpinnate, prickly, and leathery; the yellow flowers are gathered in racemes. There are more than 100 species, distributed in North and Central America, as well as in Asia from the Himalayas to Japan and Sumatra. The Oregon grape (Mahonia aquifolia) is a shrub measuring up to 1 m tall, with shiny dark green leaves and bright yellow many-flowered terminal racemes. It grows wild in the western part of North America and is cultivated as an ornamental in the temperate belt of the northern hemisphere. In severe winters the Oregon grape freezes. In a number of species the mature fruits, dark blue berries with a gray bloom or down, are used in candies and baked goods.

References in periodicals archive ?
BRIGHT: the spikes of a Mahonia will add colour to your garden in winter
Mahonias like moist, well drained soil in sun or shade.
It was Mahonia aquifolium, not the most spectacular species but nonetheless welcome.
Worth a place in the garden on the merit of foliage alone, at this time of year mahonias really hit the jackpot by starting to flower.
The best of these, Mahonia 'Charity', will carry its flowers into early spring and is a marvellous companion for Camelia sasanqua which I have seen in flower before Christmas.
For small gardens, I would not recommend that you consider planting mahonias as they can reach up to 3 metres (10ft) high and 2 metres (6ft) wide in a few short years.
Mahonias demand little in return for their long-lasting display.
Most belong to shrubs or small trees, such as mahonias and daphnes.
It is the barberry family and is represented not only by the true barberries but by nandinas, mahonias and epimediums as well.
The prickly evergreen mahonias are also excellent value in the early part of winter, racemes of lemon-yellow, slightly scented flowers carried during November and December.