rigging

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rigging,

the wires, ropes, and chains employed to support and operate the masts, yards, booms, and sails of a vessel. Standing rigging is semipermanent, consisting mainly of mast supports, the fore-and-aft stays, and the stays running from the masthead to each side of the vessel. Running rigging includes the ropes, blocks, and other apparatus needed to brace the yards, make or take in sails, and hoist cargo.

Rigging

 

(1) The ropes and lines aboard a vessel used to support spars, hoist cargo, and handle sails. Standing rigging, which includes shrouds and stays, serves to secure spars, including masts and topmasts. Both ends of a line of the standing rigging, which may consist of a steel cable, chain, or rod with a turnbuckle, are permanently fastened. Running rigging is used to hoist and lower signals, ship’s boats, booms, and cargo; on sailing vessels it is used to handle the sails and the movable spars. One end of the line of the running rigging is usually made of cable or chain and fastened either permanently or to a movable element, such as a cargo hook; the other end of the line is pulled by a traction mechanism or is fastened temporarily. On sailing vessels, the running rigging for handling movable spars includes halyards for hoisting yards, braces for swinging and trimming yards horizontally, and lifts for raising or lowering yards; the running rigging for handling sails includes halyards, sheets, brails, and tacks. The strength and operating condition of lines in the important parts of rigging used in cargo hoists and shipboard safety equipment, such as mooring or life-saving gear, are prescribed by classification societies.

(2) Cables, slings, and chains used in combination with hoisting gear to lift heavy loads and equipment for assembly, construction, and other operations.

E. G. LOGVINOVICH

rigging

[′rig·iŋ]
(aerospace engineering)
The shroud lines attached to a parachute.
(naval architecture)
Collectively, all the ropes and chains employed to support and work the masts, yards, booms, and sails of a vessel.

stage rigging

Collectively, the ropes, wires, blocks, pulleys, pins, counterweights, winches, and other pieces of stage equipment required for the movement of scenery from overhead.

rigging

The final adjustment and alignment of an aircraft and its flight control systems to provide the proper aerodynamic reaction. See rigging position.

rigging

1. the shrouds, stays, halyards, etc., of a vessel
2. the bracing wires, struts, and lines of a biplane, balloon, etc.
3. any form of lifting gear, tackle, etc.
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