androgenetic alopecia

(redirected from male pattern baldness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

androgenetic alopecia

[‚an·drə·jə¦ned·ik ‚al·ə′pē·shə]
(medicine)
The most common cause of hair loss, characterized by gradual progression, with miniaturization of genetically programmed hair follicles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those at the back and sides of the head are often immune, giving rise to the 'monk's crown' characteristic of male pattern baldness.
Instead of spending billions each year trying to reverse or cure their hair loss, the counterintuitive prescription of this research to men experiencing male pattern baldness is to shave their heads.
Much to his chagrin, Adler is part of the 60 percent of the hair loss population experiencing male pattern baldness.
The researchers trawled the Medline and the Cochrane Library databases for research published on male pattern baldness and coronary heart disease, and came up with 850 possible studies, published between 1950 and 2012.
Scientists made the discovery after carrying out tests on scalp tissue from more than 22 men with male pattern baldness, also known as adrogenic alopecia (AGA).
A link between male pattern baldness and prostate cancer may exist via the 5[alpha]-reductase enzyme, which converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT).
The drug achieves both effects by ratcheting down production of dihydrotestosterone, a hormone linked to male pattern baldness and enlargement of the prostate.
The A-to-Z guide to common health problems examines everything from male pattern baldness to male menopause (the catch phrase for the gradual decrease of testosterone levels that comes with age).
Male pattern baldness is hereditary, but in 90 per cent of cases the rogue gene comes from the mother's side.
A link exists between the lack of oxygen in the cells of the scalp and male pattern baldness, according to a study by plastic surgeon Steven L.
A ticking time-bomb for those poor unfortunates suffering from male pattern baldness.
For more than a decade, The Bald Truth, hosted by Kobren, has been advising listeners on various issues concerning male pattern baldness, which affects about 30 percent of men by the age of 35.