Sibling

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Related to male sibling: half sister

Sibling

(dreams)
It is very common for us to dream about all different types of people. Siblings are a fantastic source of dream material. Our siblings are important to us emotionally and psychologically. We are bound to them on some level throughout our lives; thus, they will appear in our dreams in many different forms. We learn important lessons about ourselves through our brothers and sisters. They are a reflection on us, and we can not escape their presence and their love, hate, or any other emotion. If you have many unresolved issues with your siblings, it is likely that they will frequently appear in your dreams.
References in periodicals archive ?
Causes included domestic abuse, favoritism expressed by parents toward male siblings, forced marriage and preventing marriage, according to the head of the committee Samira Mashhor in a recent interview in Al-Watan daily.
In other cases the male siblings are close and a smooth transition to the second generation of ownership is seen.
If a parent is declared by the public services to be "fully disabled, missing, or dead due to war" then, the eldest son of a family is exempt, while other male siblings need to serve 13 months.
Women have fewer opportunities than men to live free from fear; fear from harassment from male siblings, fathers, uncles, even male cousins, if they follow their own will in choosing life partners.
As aristocracies in England and France struggled to meet the economic demands of escalating dowries and the restrictions primogeniture imposed on them, partible inheritance assured German noble families of a certain equality among inheriting male siblings and helped to fix dowries for their daughters.
When not alone, male fawns were more likely to be with male siblings October-May than with female siblings (Table 1).
Newry Beo's female offspring outshone their male siblings on the track, and some are already proven dams of winners.
And yet women do face enormous additional obstacles to the AIDS threat because of their sex, such as their lack of inheritance or land-ownership rights, the way male siblings are favoured over girl children in access to food or schooling, the pressure to exchange sex for safety or economic survival, and in a dozen other ways.
Lethal Pena-Shokeir 1 syndrome in three male siblings.
Even when enrolled, female students can find themselves at a disadvantage because of work they must do before and after school at home--often cooking and cleaning while their male siblings are studying or playing sport.