malignant hypertension


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Related to malignant hypertension: essential hypertension, benign hypertension

malignant hypertension

[mə′līg·nənt ‚hī·pər′ten·chən]
(medicine)
A severe form of hypertension with a rapid course leading to progressive cardiac and renal vascular disease. Also known as accelerated hypertension.
References in periodicals archive ?
He has been compliant with blood pressure medications, especially after severe headaches with malignant hypertension.
The cause of malignant hypertension in this age group (21-30yr.
Contraindications included diabetes, peptic ulcer disease, renal or hepatic dysfunction, connective tissue disease, malignant hypertension, HIV infection, or immunosuppression.
There have been many reports of malignant hypertension among patients on [beta]-blockers who are given epinephrine, but these have involved massive quantities of epinephrine.
If it starts to get in the 180's to 200's, we call it malignant hypertension.
Retinal hemorrhage in children is occasionally associated with nontraumatic causes such as leukemia or malignant hypertension, but the injury patterns are different than those seen with abuse.
In March 2003, a patient aged 69 years with a history of diabetic nephropathy and hypertension was admitted to a Houston-area hospital with malignant hypertension and acute renal failure.
High pressures with headache indicate risk of seizure or stroke from malignant hypertension.
TARGET ORGAN DAMAGE: Neurological target organ damage included acute intracerebral hemorrhage 15 patients (30%), subarachnoid hemorrhage in 2 patients (4%), acute ischemic stroke 6 patients (12%), hypertensive encephalopathy in 1 patient (2%), cardiac target organ damage were acute left ventricular failure 14 patients (28%), acute myocardial infarction in 2 patients (6%), unstable angina in 7 patients (14%), and malignant hypertension in 3 patient (6%).
Risk factors include malignant hypertension, eclampsia, medications such as immunosuppressants (including tacrolimus and cyclosporine), chemotherapy, biotherapy, and renal failure1.

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