malocclusion


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malocclusion

[¦mal·ə′klü·zhən]
(medicine)
Faulty occlusion of the teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Factors such as growing number of patients with malocclusions, jaw diseases, tooth decay/tooth loss, and jaw pain; technological advancements in the field of orthodontics; increasing demand for orthodontic treatment among adolescents; and rising disposable incomes in developing countries such as India, China, and Brazil having relatively high DMFT (Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth) index are driving the growth of the orthodontic supplies market.
spasticity, hyperactive masticatory muscles, malocclusion and emotional stress.
8220;Our dental clinic uses the latest and most advanced techniques to help eliminate the pain and discomfort caused by malocclusion,” says Dr.
Treatment is usually necessary only if malocclusion is severe but it can be carried out to improve appearance, to prevent strain from an abnormal bite (which causes pain, stiffness and sometimes arthritis in the jaw joints), or to make cleaning of the teeth easier and therefore helping prevent periodontal disease and decay.
116), whereas the proportions were found to be different between boys and girls for the following oral conditions: bacterial plaque, gingivitis, dental caries, malocclusion, developmental anomalies and restorations.
2005) Early childhood pacifier use in relation to breastfeeding, SIDS, infection and dental malocclusion.
4) However, if malocclusion is a primary factor in the cranial strain, then the osteopathic adjustment may be compromised by the forces of occlusion canceling the effects of the manipulation.
Malocclusion can have a profound effect on both function and appearance.
Severity of the malocclusion, tooth eruption patterns, oral hygiene level, periodontal (gum tissue) status, decay activity and functional and esthetic issues are all considered before beginning active treatment.
There are certain malocclusions like prominent or protruding front teeth that make them more prone to damage, but early orthodontic treatment can correct the problem by moving teeth out of the dangerous 'fracture zone,'" says Alquizar, a child and adult orthodontist.
Indeed, I would argue that the main controversy--and perhaps the reason for the full lecture hall--surrounds the treatment of Class II malocclusion.
Symptoms include painful mastication, clicking, trismus, malocclusion, and deep pain in the joint.