mandible


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mandible

1. the lower jawbone in vertebrates
2. either of a pair of mouthparts in insects and other arthropods that are usually used for biting and crushing food
3. Ornithol either the upper or the lower part of the bill, esp the lower part

mandible

[′man·də·bəl]
(anatomy)
The bone of the lower jaw.
The lower jaw.
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various mouthparts in many invertebrates designed to hold or bite into food.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mandible has no sutures, so there is no surface at which arch perimeter can be created.
Hyperbaric oxygen as an adjunct in the treatment of osteoradionecrosis of the mandible.
Losses of enzymes and partially digested prey tissues may occur in and around the distal end of the mandible when Thermonectus basilaris larvae capture prey and during feeding.
According to published data on tumor location in 184 patients, DF most often involved the following bones: mandible (22%), femur (15%), pelvic bones (13%), radius (12%), and tibia (9%).
Simmering behind the announcement is a dispute that has been brewing since the 1995 discovery of Abel's mandible.
The 3 sets of observations for each mandible were then matched using licence number.
While a student, Mr Klardie modeled the human edentulous (toothless) mandible hosting six implants supporting a dental bridge.
Many feel that people with mandible fractures need to be admitted to the hospital and treated surgically on an emergency or urgent basis.
The image of the photograph is removed from the monitor, and the image of the cranium and articulated mandible is oriented manually until the position approximates that of the individual in the photograph.
11) This tumor occurs as frequently in the maxilla as it does in the mandible.
This accuracy and ease-of-use allows dentists to quickly and easily capture the optimal position of the mandible.
Desomplastic fibroma of the mandible is a rare, benign but locally aggressive bone tumour that was first reported in the mandible by Griffith and Irby in 1965 (1).