mandibular gland


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

mandibular gland

[man′dib·yə·lər ′gland]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The patients were diagnosed as having sialolithiasis in sub mandibular gland on basis of clinical and radiographic findings.
The mandibular gland shows a rounded contour and its duct crosses along the occiptomandibular face of the digastric muscle and styloglossus muscle and opens in the mouth on the sublingual caruncle near the frenulum (Figure 1 and 2).
The common presence of structure-related compounds in these glands is known, and 3-heptanone and 4-methyl-3-heptanone have also been found in mandibular gland secretions of other Attini species: Atta sexdens, A.
Especially, the occipital artery and branches that extended to the mandibular gland and to the medial retropharyngeal lenf node of the ascending palatine artery were responsible for the vascularization of the cranial cervical ganglion.
The predisposition to calculi, and ability to tolerate expansion, lead to a higher incidence of giant calculi associated with sub mandibular gland.
In a series of 68 patients with oncocytic salivary gland tumors, 84% of tumors occurred in the parotid gland, 11% occurred in the soft mandibular gland, and 5% represented incidental findings in the cervical lymph nodes) Most patients presented with unilateral painless masses.
The males have two mandibular glands and antennae basically 4-segmented with an anellus, while the female has one gland and do not break off the antennae and wings when they penetrate through the ostiolum (Ramirez, 1970).
The most abundant compounds in queen mandibular glands are 9-keto- and 9-hydroxy-2(E)-decenoic acids, while the most abundant compound in worker mandibular glands is 10-hydroxy-2(E)-decenoic acid.
Both processes begin with the stearic acid that worker and queen honeybees (Apis mellifera) produce in their mandibular glands.